Categories
Precinct Leadership Program

Public sector leaders focused on team growth and development opportunities

More than 30 senior public sector leaders have completed executive leadership programs in Port Moresby over the past two weeks, coming away with practical skills and knowledge to build teams that are motivated to achieve collective goals for PNG.

The ‘Building High Performing Teams’ and ‘Coaching and Developing Others’ courses were a collaboration between the Department of Personnel Management and the Australian Public Service Commission.

The three-day courses were supported by the PNG-Australia Partnership, through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, and recognise that strong public service leaders – women and men working collectively – are vital to service delivery and policy development.

Vicky Puipui, a participant of this recent short course program said she was privileged to attend because the training has broadened her knowledge of coaching and mentoring to fully support various staff needs at work.

“This training is very important for all the managers within the public service machinery, because we are dealing with human beings and we are all different,” Ms Puipui said.

“It’s like a check and balance for me – the training was very beneficial and I’ve learnt new things – new interventions in this course.

“I learnt about the application of coaching, communication and especially listening skills.”

Vicky Puipui entered the public service 30 years ago as a keyboard operator with the Office of Library and Archives and is now the Assistant Director – Public Records Management.

More than 120 public service leaders have completed short courses delivered by the Department of Personnel Management and the Australian Public Services Commission since 2018.

This recent training on ‘Building High Performing Teams’ is aimed at developing managerial leadership skills that can boost team performance and achieve positive team outcomes.

The Precinct is a partnership between PNG and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable and inclusive public sector leaders.

Categories
Announcements

BCfW scholarships to continue in 2020

Caitlin Wilson delivers closing remarks at the BCfW graduation ceremony.

The PNG–Australia Partnership will continue to support development opportunities for women to step into leadership.

Precinct scholarships will be awarded to 10 public servants to undertake the BCfW Certificate IV in Leadership and Management.

Deputy Australian High Commissioner Caitlin Wilson made the announcement at the BCfW graduation ceremony in August.

She said the empowerment of women is a top priority for the PNG-Australia Partnership.

“Gender equality promotes prosperity, stability and security in our region,” Ms Wilson said.

“For these reasons we must support the empowerment of women, and especially women in leadership.

“Everyone deserves the opportunity to fulfil their potential as individuals, and as valued members of families, communities, organisations and countries.”

Categories
Precinct Leadership Program

Public sector women empowered to fulfil their leadership potential

Shirley Kangol Albert celebrates her graduation.

A group of emerging public sector leaders celebrated the completion of the Certificate IV in Leadership and Management at the Business Coalition for Women (BCfW) graduation ceremony in August.

The eight public servants were supported to undertake the program by the PNG-Australia Partnership through the Precinct.

The course saw participants learn alongside private sector peers.

Among the graduates was Shirley Kangol Albert, internal inspector with the Department of Works.

She said it provided practical lessons on professionalism, networking and behaviour-styles.

Ms Albert believed the program helped her and her team coordinate and prepare for PNG’s APEC year and the successful hosting of agricultural meetings with help and mentoring from her team coordinators.

“Those acquired skills will raise performance when participants apply them or are given opportunities to apply them,” she said.

“The skills will also inspire them to become change agents to confidently work alongside men within their organisations by offering solutions.

“They can suggest better and effective ways to get things done to achieve their organisation’s goals.”

The Certificate IV in Leadership and Management was delivered over six months.

It provided participants with targeted, competency-based training that prepared them for leadership and management roles.

It provided participants with targeted, competency-based training that prepared them for leadership and management roles.

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Precinct Leadership Program

Public service executives ready to build high-performing teams

Ilikomau Ali applies PNG’s Leadership Capability Framework to her coursework.

A group of Papua New Guinea’s top public servants believe they can empower teams to reach their full potential following the completion of a high-level executive program.

Twenty participants took part in the Building High-Performing Teams short course to develop their managerial leadership skills and elevate team performance in the public sector.

The course was a collaboration between the Department of Personnel Management and the Australian Public Service Commission, and supported by the PNG-Australia Partnership.

Among the participants was Office of Censorship executive manager Ilikomau Ali.

“As leaders, our role is critical in serving the people of this country with effectiveness and efficiency,” Ms Ali said.

“We need a team that is equipped with positive attitudes, the right values and good characters in order to drive the public services and goods to the people.

“I have identified my potential to be an active leader, which is central to developing a team of employees who should have the drive, focus, energy and capability to communicate and deliver the strategic plan of the organisation.”

The course was guided by the PNG Government’s public service Leadership Capability Framework and Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy.

Ms Ali said it enabled women to be respected and seen as equal partners in the workforce.

“The PNG public service is creating equal opportunities for women and training of this level will pave the way for more women to be promoted to higher levels in decision-making processes.”

Since 2018, more than 60 public servants have completed Building High-Performing Teams and the complementary course Coaching and Developing Others. Women represented 42 per cent of all participants.

Categories
News and Information

Australia Awards scholarship applications open!

Want to make a difference in Papua New Guinea and become a leader in your field? 

Australia Awards Scholarships offer more than a degree.  Awardees gain a world-class education and a life-changing experience at tertiary institutions across Australia and upon return, contribute towards PNG’s development.

Applications for study in 2021 are open now and close on 30 April 2020 (midnight PNG time).

Scholarships are offered in the following priority sectors: agriculture, education, governance, health, law and justice, and transport and infrastructure. Women and people living with disability are encouraged to apply.

To find out more visit www.australiaawardspng.org or the Australia Awards in PNG Information Centre at the Westpac Building, Waigani, Port Moresby

Categories
Gender

TENDER: GESI Policy Review

Abt Associates on behalf of the Australian Government through the Public Sector Leadership and Reform Partnership is seeking submissions from suitable organisations (consulting firms, non-profit organizations, academic institutions etc.) with the expertise and capability to provide policy review advisory services to support the Department of Personnel Management to review and revise the National Public Service Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy.

Since 2016, the Australian Government, through the Public Sector Leadership and Reform Partnership, has supported the Department of Personnel Management with the implementation of the GESI policy. This includes subnational roll-out of GESI Policy through Policy Implementation Planning Sessions with Provincial and District Administrations and Provincial Health Authorities, central and subnational delivery of Male Advocacy Training, and the development Monitoring and Evaluation Framework and Database.

The Department of Personnel Management has requested support from the Australian Government to enable the technical review and revision of the GESI Policy given it has been over six years since the launch of the policy.

Those interested in participating in this competitive approach to market can request the Request For Proposal (RFP) documentation from the Abt Associates Contact Officer at – procurement@amspng.org or can access the RFP documents from https://www.abtassociates.com/solicitations/australia-solicitations

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Newsletter

Precinct newsletter: Issue 1

Precinct_Newsletter_Issue 001


The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is pleased to present the first issue of our newsletter.

Each newsletter will provide an overview of recent activities, insights on core public sector skills and a closer look at the way Papua New Guinea’s public servants are making a positive impact as ethical, capable and inclusive leaders.

Highlights in this issue include:

  • The opening of the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance children’s library.
  • A profile of the University of Papua New Guinea’s first ever Master of Economic and Public Policy graduate.
  • A summary of the 2019 Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion events.
Categories
Gender

Male champion knows gender equality is everyone’s business

Emmanuel Ginis has dedicated the last eight years of his career to improving conditions and opportunities for women in the country’s biggest employer: the Government of Papua New Guinea.

“PNG has eight going on 10 million people – half are women and girls,” he says.

“If they can’t get in to a position to use their brains, hands and feet, then that is a huge loss for PNG’s development.”

Emmanuel leads the government’s push for greater equality for all Papua New Guineans as the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Manager at the Department of Personnel Management.

An important part of his role is to make a pathway for more women in the public service to step into leadership positions, which can bring benefits within the organisation and to the broader community.

“I would like to see an equal number of men and women participating in employment,” he says.

“It’s a bigger issue where more men are holding decision-making and management roles in the public service.

“Employing more women means we would be putting money in the pay packets of families and households.”

There are significant benefits to Papua New Guinea when women are supported to participate in the economy.

A 2018 study estimated women’s equal participation would increase PNG’s gross domestic product – the total value of goods produced and services provided in a year – by nearly 14 per cent.

Emmanuel’s passion for equality goes back to 2011 when he contributed to the development of the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy, which now informs expectations on government agencies and public servants throughout the country.

Today, he travels to the provinces and districts with support from the PNG-Australia Partnership to communicate the principles and values of GESI to public servants and explain how they can be implemented day-to-day in their workplaces and the communities they serve.

Emmanuel Ginis (standing) joins a group discussion at a GESI training session held in Jiwaka in October this year.

He admits these conversations aren’t always easy. “When we first mention gender to an agency, they would say: ‘it’s a women’s issue, let’s get all the women and they will discuss the issues’.”

“What they don’t realise is this is an issue that everyone should be responsible for.

“Men have dominating power and control over a lot of areas of government and decision-making – we can see this in our own communities – so having that conversation with them opens up their minds to how they can advocate for gender equality.”

Change doesn’t happen overnight, but Emmanuel is confident that the push for gender equality is building momentum.

A broader national conversation on the topic has sparked and Emmanuel says agencies and individuals are regularly getting in-touch with him for more information.

“That’s a good thing because when you are inquisitive about something, that’s when learning starts,” he says.

“A lot of public servants want to know more and now it’s up to us to provide that information to them in the best way possible.”

Emmanuel (left) during a session in Kavieng, New Ireland Province.

While Emmanuel’s remit only extends to government agencies, he believes the impact of gender equity and social inclusion will be felt by the broader community.

“It’s about leadership, capacity, resources and breaking through those cultural barriers that we have in our workplaces and communities,” he says.

“We want to iron out our issues – whatever challenges we have personally or within the workplace – then we work towards delivering services for the people.

“We are clearing a pathway for women to rise up and be part of the development of our country.  It starts in our homes, into our schools and then it comes to the workplace.”

The Department of Personnel Management has now delivered sessions that provide guidance on implementation of the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy to provincial administrations and agencies in East New Britain, Jiwaka, Madang, Manus, New Ireland, Morobe, Oro, Simbu, Western Highlands and West Sepik.

Many of the 532 participants are now – like Emmanuel – making equality their business each and every day.



Categories
Gender UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Student’s passion for equality makes a mark at UPNG

Mapusaga Tanuvasa: a strong sense of justice and desire for equity.

Mapusaga Tanuvasa has seen the realities of inequity and exclusion up close and personal.

“I’ve witnessed my mother,” he said, reminiscing about his childhood, “she has a degree, but no matter how many years and how hard she worked they never promoted her to anything above an officer.”

“They gave her the extra workload, but she never got promoted to manager until very recently.”

While this was not a unique situation, it was discordant with Mapusaga’s sense of justice and sparked a desire to see all Papua New Guineans given a level playing field to fulfil their potential, so it is not entirely surprising that he decided undertake a law degree at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG).

This year, his fourth and final of study, he was given an opportunity to pursue gender equity, oppose discrimination and permanently influence campus life.

Mapusaga was one of 35 UPNG students and staff invited to form a committee to develop the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy and mechanisms for it to be enforced.

The committee researched international best practice and drafted a policy specific to the UPNG context.

Committee members were tasked to work on specific sections of the policy, including disability, workplace harassment, gender-based violence, sexual harassment, and safety and security.

Members of the UPNG GESI Committee after a meeting at UPNG in September last year.

The new approach echoes the PNG Government’s own commitment to equality, including through the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy.

The UPNG Policy, which was developed with support by the Papua New Guinea-Australia Partnership, has the full backing of the university’s executive and is expected to be finalised in early 2020.

In June, speaking ahead of a UPNG-hosted discussion event on gender equity, vice-chancellor Professor Frank Griffin said that women and men need to work side-by-side.

The qualities of individuals need to be acknowledged rather than their superficial differences.

“Working together allows the country to move in a direction where gender equity and gender equality will become more prominent in the years to come,” Professor Griffin said.

“To be a free thinker, at the university level, it doesn’t matter if you are male or female.”

For Mapusaga participation on the GESI committee was an opportunity to promote equality and inclusion as a responsibility to be shouldered by all people.

He knows that now the policy is on paper the hard work is in its implementation, which will address the issues of today and improve life for future students.

“The GESI Policy is written but it must also be implemented,” he said.

“I don’t think about what I would do tomorrow or next year, I think about what would happen for the future generations when they come into the university.

“What we need to change first and foremost is the mindsets,” he continued.

“It just takes a few likeminded individuals – starting with just one – and if that person is capable of influencing other people we can form a domain of influence.”

He identified the lecturers as key influencers of student attitudes – viewing them as crucial advocates and allies for gender equity and social inclusion.

“Thousands of students pass through the university every year – thousands leave educated,” Mapusaga said.

“You can change the mind of thousands of people or more in your lifetime being a lecturer.”

As his time as an undergraduate law student draws to a close, Mapusaga can be proud of the role he has played in the promotion of gender equity and social inclusion.

The hope is that the GESI Policy will remain as an important guide to attitudes and behaviour long after he’s left – a positive legacy for the institution.

Success will mean people are not excluded or unfairly treated because of their sex or gender, special needs, sexual orientation, cultural background, religious views, medical conditions or any other perceived difference.

It is certain that Mapusaga’s passion for equality and justice won’t waver – he’ll carry that with him wherever he goes.

“I’ve been writing about discrimination since my first year at UPNG,” he said.

“I don’t care if it takes me a year or many years, it’s something I want to keep pushing forward.”

Categories
Uncategorised

Disability inclusion a priority for discussion series

The discussion series provides a platform for diverse voices to participate in conversations of national importance.

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series has continued remove barriers to participation in the public events by persons living with disabilities.

The International Day of Persons with Disabilities was observed on 3 December each year to promote an understanding of persons with disabilities and encourage support for their dignity, rights and well-being.

This year’s theme is ‘promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership: taking action on the 2030 Development Agenda’.

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussions include a diverse range of people get the opportunity to express their views and ask questions.

At the most recent event Kaman Kelly, the PNG Assembly of Disabled Persons treasurer, brought a perspective from his lived experience to a discussion on tax and development.

Mr Kelly said that Papua New Guinea stood to benefit from enabling people from marginalised groups – such as persons living with disabilities – to become economically productive and pay taxes.

The discussions now feature sign-language interpreters so that people with hearing impairments can engage with the panel and provide their perspectives on topics of national importance.

The most recent event in the series included sign-language interpreters to ensure people with hearing impairments could be part of the discussion.

The venue for the series is the University of Papua New Guinea’s fully wheelchair accessible New Lecture Theatre, which was constructed with Australian Government support.

PNG and Australia are partners in strengthening social inclusion – diversity results in more innovation, increased productivity and reduced discrimination.

Categories
Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen

Taxation key for good governance says visiting expert

Professor Mick Moore presented Rwanda as a success story of the equitable levying of tax.

The old saying goes ‘nothing is certain except death and taxes’ but visiting political economist Professor Mick Moore believes that tax gets a bad rap and has an important role to play in a country’s development.

Professor Moore, Chief Executive Officer of the International Centre for Tax and Development in the UK, is currently in Port Moresby for a series of government meetings and public events to discuss the obstacles and opportunities for public revenue generation in PNG.

He said that while people might not necessarily like tax its effective collection is often linked to good governance, and better public services and infrastructure.

“There is actually quite a strong connection, globally, between the ways in which countries raise tax revenue and the ways in which they are governed,” Professor Moore said.

“When countries are well governed –  when disputes are resolved peacefully, elections are held regularly, the rule of law prevails, roads are in reasonable repair, citizens can rely on government for at least basic health, education and welfare services, and government is broadly trusted – then we generally find that government revenue systems are healthy.”

Professor Moore was the keynote speaker at the final Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series event for 2019, which was themed ‘Billions from Betel Nut?  Taxation, Growth and Governance.’

He was joined for the discussion by East Sepik Governor Allan Bird, Acting Internal Revenue Commissioner for Taxation Pauline Bre, KPMG Managing Partner Zanie Theron and Tanorama Executive Director (moderator) Martin Brash.

Panelists and audience members brought a diversity of views to the discussion.

Professor Moore’s visit and the discussion series are supported through the PNG-Australia Partnership.

The event covered a range of topics, ranging from small and medium-sized enterprises through to PNG’s extractive sector, which represented 86 per cent of total export value in 2017.

Professor Moore acknowledged it is often difficult for governments to collect income from small-scale businesses and cautioned on attempts to tax rural people.

“It’s a very expensive business,” he said, “it is easy to spend most of the money connected on the salaries of the people doing the tax collection.”

“If low income farmers are going to pay any kind of direct tax, then they should be paying small amounts to their local councils.”

Taxing the big end of town brings its own set of challenges and Professor Moore said effectively taxing the mining sector is the biggest single challenge for low-income countries globally.

“Very few have got it right,” he said, “overall, mining is significantly under-taxed – even more than oil and gas extraction.”

“We could make a good start by introducing much more transparency.”

While collecting tax is never easy, Professor Moore said there are important lessons from the rest of the world that could help PNG.

This includes innovation and technology, which he sees as a “game changer for tax collection” that has the potential to save time and money for governments and ordinary people.

“Digitisation makes it easier for taxpayers to file their returns and make payments,” Professor Moore said.

“These technologies are available to even low income countries. They may even be particularly useful for countries like PNG with scattered rural populations.”

Another critical factor is for governments to pay close attention to tax system fairness – applying the rules to everyone equally and demonstrating that tax is being spent well, rather than being wasted.

“No system of revenue raising is going to be very effective if it does not consider the views and opinions of the people we are trying to tax,” Professor Moore said.

“[Governments] need to show that they are making a good effort to make the taxpaying process as easy as possible for the taxpayers.

“Equally, they need to demonstrate that they are enforcing the rules on everyone. I’m going to be very unhappy about paying my taxes if I perceive that my neighbours are managing to avoid them.”

The event was part of the Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series that is supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership.

Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen provides a platform for open public engagement with local and international experts and explores themes and policy issues pertinent to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

Categories
Future Leaders Program

Future leaders celebrate completion of nine-month program

Participants celebrate the completion of the 2019 Future Leaders Program with PNG and Australian Government representatives.

More than 70 high-potential public servants from across Papua New Guinea have completed the Future Leaders Program.

The group of emerging leaders were awarded certificates at a ceremony in Port Moresby on Friday (eds. 29 November).

The ceremony featured remarks by Taies Sansan, Acting Department of Personnel Management Secretary, and Andrew Egan, Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor.

Nancy Yaman is presented with her completion certificate by Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor Andrew Egan.

The Future Leaders Program provides vocational training that is tailor-made for Papua New Guinea’s public sector, offering a pathway for public servants to make the step up to decision-making positions.

It is centred on the development of core skills for the public service, including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development.

Though the 2019 courses were run in Port Moresby, more than two-thirds of course participants were from provincial and district agencies.

It is also underpinned by the principles of gender equity, social inclusion and values-based leadership. More than 200 public servants have now completed the program since 2017 and over 50 per cent were women.

The nine-month program included workplace projects – a key component of the program that encourages each participant to their classroom learning to the work environment and make positive change within their organisations.

The Future Leaders Program is a key component of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable and inclusive public sector leaders.

Categories
Gender

Madang public servants ready to level the playing field

Robyn Barausiki was among the Madang public servants to benefit from the GESI sessions.

Senior Madang public servants are confident they can level the playing field for all Papua New Guineans following the completion of a workshop focused on inclusive and equitable attitudes and practices.

The weeklong session communicated the principles and values of gender equity and social inclusion (GESI) and provided guidance on their application to work and community life.

It was the latest in the Department of Personnel Management’s GESI Policy implementation planning sessions, which are rolled-out at the provincial and district levels, and supported through the Papua New Guinea-Australia Partnership.

Among nearly 40 participants were senior managers and executives from the Madang Provincial Administration and Provincial Health Authority.

The group included veteran public servant Augustine Siamoli, human resource (HR) manager at Modilon General Hospital, who said that leadership qualities can be found in women and men equally.

“There is a lot of goodness in women being leaders,” he said. “I’ve worked under two [women] – they are good leaders, they listen, they gather views, they get recommendations and if they need technical advice they seek help.”

“The GESI Policy links to everything to do with my job as HR Manager – the content of the training really touched on the importance of implementing all these activities and duties.”

Madang public servants ready to work together for greater equality.

Another participant was Robyn Borausiki, a social worker and family support centre coordinator, who works with women to address domestic violence and gender-based violence, and improving referral pathways to seek justice.

She said her work is challenging, and partnerships, training and practical policies are important to progress towards equality for all constituents in Madang.

“I am confident,” Ms Borausiki said, “when you look at the challenges and you feel like giving up, but such trainings and workshops give you hope to go back one more time and do it all over again for a positive response.”

“All genders are equal – we equip people in what we do and we can bring it forward together.

“With the GESI [Policy] in place we can look at some good strategies – which were in the workshop – to enforce and implement gender equity and social inclusion,” she continued.

“Partnerships, like with Australia, helps policies created at the national level to be carried out. We work closely with the provincial and districts governments to get all policies implemented.”

GESI Policy sessions have reached more than 500 public servants across 10 provinces. They are expected to be delivered in East Sepik and Enga before the end of 2019. Gender equity and social inclusion are the responsibilities of all people – women and men – and is important in workplaces, families, communities and schools.

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Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen

Discussion event: Billions from Betel Nut? Taxation, Growth and Governance

Join the final Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series event for 2019 in a fascinating public discussion themed ‘Billions from Betel Nut? Taxation, Growth and Governance’.

It will be held at the University of Papua New Guinea on Thursday 21 November, commencing at 2.00pm, with opening remarks by the Australian High Commissioner to PNG, Bruce Davis.

Taxes help to build free and independent nations – they are an important form of government revenue that can be redistributed towards health, education, roads and other vital public services and infrastructure.

Beyond government income, what are the broader implications of effective taxation on governance, citizens and the state? This discussion will look at obstacles to tax collection in Papua New Guinea and the relevance of different sources of revenue to PNG’s national spending goals.

It will also explore the division of responsibility between business and individuals, and national, provincial, district and local-levels of government.

The keynote speaker will be Professor Mick Moore, Chief Executive Officer of the International Centre for Tax and Development in the UK, and followed by a panel discussion with:

  • Hon Allan Bird MP, Governor, East Sepik Province
  • Pauline Bre, Acting Commissioner – Taxation, Internal Revenue Commission
  • Zanie Theron, Managing Partner, KPMG PNG
  • Martin Brash (moderator), Executive Director, Tanorama Limited

Light refreshments will be served after the event, feel free to register your interest by replying to events@amspng.org

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen series are inclusive events. This discussion will be translated by a sign language interpreter for accessibility to people with hearing impairment. The venue is wheelchair accessible.

Categories
Uncategorised

Highlands public servants come together for equity and inclusion

Public servants from three highlands provinces came together at the start of October to work towards improved gender equity and social inclusion outcomes.

The 47 participants from Jiwaka, Simbu and Western Highlands were the latest to benefit from the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy Implementation Planning Sessions.

The sessions are rolled out at the provincial level by the Department of Personnel Management and supported by the Australian Government.

The sessions communicate the principles and values of gender equity and social inclusion and provide guidance on how they can be applied to work and community life to provide a level playing field for all Papua New Guineans.

More than 476 public servants, including 153 women and 323 men, have benefitted from the GESI Policy Implementation Planning Sessions since 2016.

Upcoming sessions will strengthen inclusivity and equity in Madang, Enga and East Sepik provinces.

Categories
Uncategorised

First-ever economic and public policy graduate excited to contribute to PNG

Graduate Diploma in Economics & Public Policy program

Earlier this year Charles Wapinen became first student to complete a post-graduate economics and public policy qualification from the University of Papua New Guinea.The Australian Government, in partnership with the Government of Papua New Guinea through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, has made ten scholarships available to public sector managers for the 2020 Graduate Diploma in Economics and Public Policy.Apply today | http://pacificprecinct.org/gdepp-2020/

Posted by Australian High Commission Papua New Guinea on Tuesday, 24 September 2019

After a few minutes with Charles Wapinien it becomes clear that economic research and policy formulation are fundamental to addressing complex national challenges and shaping Papua New Guinea’s future.

“Any issues, any challenges that a country, organisation or society faces are framed into policies,” Charles said enthusiastically.

“There are many areas within economics. My specific area is in research, specifically quantitative research to do with policies and socio-economic issues.”

The father of two, originally from East Sepik but a long-time resident of Port Moresby, has a good grounding in economics – as a student, teacher and practitioner.

“I have a background in economics from Grade 12 and my undergraduate program was a Bachelor of Economics,” he continued

“I was interested because I like maths and I’m good at maths!

“I worked with BSP for seven years and then taught economics at Port Moresby Grammar School.”

Charles Wapinien: the first Master of Economic and Public Policy Graduate.

In 2017, while teaching, Charles saw an opportunity to go back to school himself through the new University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) post-graduate program in economic and public policy.

The program, offered as a Masters or Graduate Diploma, was designed and taught as a collaboration between the UPNG School of Business & Public Policy (SBPP) and the Australian National University (ANU).

Students are given the opportunity to develop their knowledge and ability to create and implement effective policy in the national interest.

The two-year Master of Economic and Public Policy had ‘Charles Wapinien’ written all over it and he wasted no time in signing up.

The degree program gave Charles an academic platform to boost his skills in economic and public policy analysis in a way that he could apply in the workplace.

“The learning is critical to understanding concepts and theories, and applying them to practical scenarios,” he said.

“Zooming down on the specifics of economics, I’m very interested in quantitative modelling – that’s what I worked towards in my final research paper.”

Charles also spoke highly of the UPNG-ANU connection – an institutional link supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

“The ANU lecturers and their UPNG counterparts motivate the whole study process,” he said.

“People like [UPNG SBPP deputy dean] Dr Lawrence Sause and my supervisor [ANU team leader] Dr Manoj Pandey – these people are my real inspirations.

Dr Manoj Pandey enjoys the colour and excitement at the 63rd UPNG graduation ceremony.

Dr Manoj Pandey, ANU team leader and economics lecturer, has worked as part of the UPNG School of Business & Public Policy team since 2016.

He reiterated that economics and public policy are vital disciplines and was certain the students have all the tools needed to make a big contribution regardless of the path they take.

“They will definitely play a major role in developing PNG,” Dr Pandey said.

“Economics is important for every country and public policy is one of the pillars for development.”

After two-and-a-half years of hard work – classes, discussion and research – Charles Wapinien was at the centre of an historic moment as the first-ever recipient of the degree at the 63rd UPNG Graduation Ceremony.

UPNG chancellor Robert Igara presents Charles with his well-deserved degree.

“It was a milestone achievement not only for me but for my family as well,” Charles said, reflecting on the day, “a great feeling especially considering that there were a lot of sacrifices undertaken.”

His mentor Dr Pandey was similarly delighted to be present as Charles graduated, along with a cohort of undergraduate economics students.

“Charles is the first Master of Economic and Public Policy graduate – it was wonderful to see,” he said.

“You work with the students for a few years, then suddenly they’re in a colourful gown, degree in hand – for any lecturer it’s always a pleasure to see them graduated.”

UPNG’s School of Business & Public Policy is currently taking applications for the 2020 Graduate Diploma of Economic and Public Policy, which is a precursor to the full master’s program.

It was also announced recently that ten scholarships places will be awarded to middle and senior managers in the PNG public service, whose work focuses on economic management and government policy formulation.

The places are supported the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between the Papua New Guinean and Australian Governments supporting the development of public sector leadership in PNG.

Charles has already made good use of his skills as the research manager at Anglo Pacific Research. He encouraged others to take up the program and predicted he too will return to university.

“I give my encouragement to those interested to take it up,” he said, ““down the track, I’m looking at a PhD.”

“The skills and knowledge I learned are very important for the country as a whole. Doors are opening and I am here to contribute to development.”

Categories
Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen

Diverse panel says heritage has an important role to play in modern PNG

The role of tradition and heritage in contemporary Papua New Guinea is a complex topic, and one that is commonly debated in communities and households throughout the country.

An expert panel and an engaged audience voiced a variety of perspectives at a public event themed ‘Cultural Heritage in Modern PNG: Protecting Our Values’, which was held on Monday (eds. 23 September) at the University of Papua New Guinea.

The discussion was part of the Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen series and among the areas covered were the relevance of custom to commerce, agriculture, society and the environment.

Speakers included Dr Andrew Moutu, National Museum and Art Gallery Director; Marie Mondu, Catholic Bishops Conference Development Secretary; Sharlene Gawi, Bilum Culture owner; and Martin Brash, Tanorama Limited Executive Director.

Dr Moutu said cultural heritage connects to communities in a way that expands beyond possession, inheritance and succession.

“It relates to material structures, institutional complexes and social practices,” Dr Moutu said, “and carries a powerful emotional charge and value structure emanating from the idea of belonging, association or identity bound up with a certain form of cultural heritage.”

“What is consistent in the story of its origin is the view that cultural heritage is set on a mission to civilise the nations of the world anew.

“This is based on understanding a country’s historic past and present and a commitment to enact certain program actions to enable individual countries to progress towards a better future.”

Marie Mondu said maintaining traditional relationships with the natural environment will be vital in building climate change resilient communities.

“If you take the environment away from a Papua New Guinean you extinguish part of that person and their identity,” she said.

“Our environment is our lifeline – we get our food, our oxygen, our identity from the forest, land and ocean.

“We take from them, but respectfully. There are limits and the elders will tell you when you start doing harm to the environment,” Ms Mondu continued.

“Go to our indigenous knowledge about food preservation and drought resistant crops – in a way you are bringing that cultural knowledge back.”

Sharlene Gawi explored the commoditisation of cultural artefacts and said that understanding their meaning is key to continued relevance.

“We have to respect the traditional knowledge that’s passed down,” she said, “we need to be respectful in how we commercialise our culture.”

“It’s not a bad thing – it provides economic empowerment – but you have to go about it respectfully so the beneficiaries are the people.

“Our stories, the meaning of our names, the significance of bilum making and ways of building houses – it really does shape our values, attitudes and decision-making going forward.”

Ms Gawi said Papua New Guineans need to take responsibility when it comes to learning the cultural significance of bilums, the symbolism of their patterns and the respecting the labour the goes in to production.

“There are stories about the bilum and the value they hold in society that we haven’t really brought through – they are so important and so unique,” Ms Gawi said.

“Some are made with three different plants – three different natural fibres – which vary in strength and colour, but each playing an equal role.

“That’s like us – every one of us is like a link in that bilum,” she continued, “once one loop unravels, it all unravels.

“Each year we celebrate Independence and we should also celebrate our dependence on each other as Papua New Guineas.” The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen public discussion series is supported by the PNG-Australia Partnership to give Papua New Guineans a say on important national issues. The events are recorded for television and radio and will be broadcast later this year.

Categories
UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

2020 Graduate Diploma of Economic & Public Policy

Graduate Diploma in Economics & Public Policy program

Earlier this year Charles Wapinen became first student to complete a post-graduate economics and public policy qualification from the University of Papua New Guinea.The Australian Government, in partnership with the Government of Papua New Guinea through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, has made ten scholarships available to public sector managers for the 2020 Graduate Diploma in Economics and Public Policy.Apply today | http://pacificprecinct.org/gdepp-2020/

Posted by Australian High Commission Papua New Guinea on Tuesday, 24 September 2019

Scholarship applications for the Graduate Diploma of Economic and Public Policy are now closed.

For more information about programs at the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business & Public Policy, please contact Lisa Marie Kila – Ph: 3267 299 / 3267 305 | E: sbpp@upng.ac.pg

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration

New PILAG children’s library opens to the public

Kids from Port Moresby schools show-off their phonics skills during the opening of the PILAG Children’s Library.

A new Children’s Library at the Pacific Institute Leadership and Governance (PILAG) is now open to the public, giving local kids access to books, learning programs and modern technology.

To celebrate, more than 30 Port Moresby pre- and primary school children took part in open day activities, which included group reading, colouring, singing and exploration of books.

The open day marked the partnership between PILAG and Buk bilong Pikinini and was held ahead of International Literacy Day on Sunday 8 September.

The two organisations have joined forces to provide learning opportunities to local children, making full use of the facilities at the new Library, which was opened to the public in June and constructed through the PNG-Australia Partnership.

PILAG Chief Librarian Eric Nandoma said the collaboration with Buk bilong Pikinini is part of a broader vision to engage communities in the area.

“The revitalised PILAG remains committed to the development of public service leaders by providing vocational training to meet the nation’s needs,” he said.

“We know that these youngsters will one day grow-up and become the leaders of Papua New Guinea, so we need to do our best to give them opportunities to fulfil their potential.

“At PILAG we have a new, world-class library and it is our duty to provide an avenue for families and communities to be part of their children’s learning and development.”

“…these youngsters will one day grow-up and become the leaders of Papua New Guinea, so we need to do our best to give them opportunities to fulfil their potential.”

Eric Nandoma, Chief Librarian

Buk bilong Pikinini has established library learning centres with partners across Papua New Guinea – both in urban centres and regional areas.

Founder Anne-Sophie Hermann said working with PILAG is an excellent opportunity to provide children in the neighbourhood with learning opportunities and books to support their education.

“These centres help increase literacy rates, and foster a love of reading and learning in children,” she said.

“Access to books is an important aspect of a child’s overall development – it is the foundation for solid academic performance, and for socialising and managing all aspects of life.

“The language experiences that children have before they start school – like talking, singing and reading – form powerful brain connections, which are used for thinking and understanding.”

The PILAG Library allows children and adults to select from a large variety of books to suit their interests. Books can be borrowed free of charge, so anyone can access what they need for their education or enjoyment.

“We hope the children’s section will form a vital part of the PILAG Library where families and community members can come together to read and browse all the books on offer,” Ms Hermann continued.

“We are looking forward to supporting PILAG to run Buk bilong Pikinini’s early childhood literacy program for pre-school children.

“Through this program, five-year-old children will prepare for school and develop solid foundations in literacy, numeracy, cultural and health awareness, alongside learning to be disciplined and being respectful to others.”

LIBRARY OPENING HOURS
Monday – Friday: 9:00am – 4:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am – 1:00pm
(Closed on Sunday & public holidays)

CONTACT DETAILS
Phone: 3030657 / 3030659 / 72581854
Email: pilaglibrary@gmail.com or nandoma.eric@gmail.com

Categories
News and Information PNG Institute of Public Administration

PILAG embraces cutting-edge library technology

Modern library innovations have changed Moi’s work for the better.

When a 16-year old Moi Malala started work at the Administrative College library in 1975 she could not have imagined the incredible technological revolution that was to come.

There have been many changes at the Administrative College over the years – it was renamed to the PNG Institute of Public Administration and then, in 2018, to the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance (PILAG).

The rise and rise of information technology has also made changes and irreversibly altered Moi’s profession and the way information is accessed around the world.

The revitalised PILAG remains committed to the development of public service leaders by providing vocational training to meet the nation’s needs and is looking to an increasingly digital approach to information management.

In June, the Institute opened its new library to the public. Its construction was supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Online databases are an invaluable resource for learning and research.

Its digital library system has enhanced the way staff, students and the public can utilise information, access learning resources and conduct research.

The new library will bring great benefits to the education of Papua New Guinea’s future leaders, not to mention Moi and her seven colleagues, who previously managed nearly 40,000 items manually.

“I am looking forward to using the new system – I’m happy to be part of the change and the new technology,” she said.

“It will save a lot of time – quicker processing of the books, and managing the library and for reporting purposes as well.”

The system has been introduced at PILAG and University of Papua New Guinea, both core institutions of the Precinct – a partnership between PNG and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders. It includes access to global online databases and digitised local collections.

The PILAG Library also has a BookEye Scanner, a specialised device for the digitising rare and fragile books and other historic documents.

The V-shaped scanning device cradles documents naturally to avoid damage during the scanning process.

Chief librarian Eric Nandoma tests out the new BookEye scanner.

Chief librarian Eric Nandoma said the scanner and online cataloguing are part of a broader digitisation plan.

“The scanner will assist staff to digitise our rare and fragile resources – most of these are historical PNG materials and government policy documents,” he said.

“The PNG Collection holds information on PNG which cannot be found at any other library in the country.

“They have become old and fragile and the BookEye Scanner will help restore and preserve them for generations to use for research and study,” Mr Nandoma continued.

“Once scanned, the images will be catalogued and stored online for access by staff, students and the public.”

Change always presents some challenges, but Moi, Eric and the rest of the PILAG library team aren’t interested in being stuck in the past and have embraced the new technology.

“I am happy with the new system,” Moi said.

“It might take some time for us to get used to working with the computer setup, but I’m a librarian – I know how a library works.”

Categories
Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen

The Future of Universities: Knowledge Leaders in Policy Development and Industry Innovation

Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor Andrew Egan with panellists Jane Ravusiro, Professor Peter Høj and Professor Frank Griffin.

The event explored the important role that universities play preparing the workforce of the future and in building a nation. Hosted by The University of PNG (UPNG), the audience enjoyed a robust discussion on the topic ‘Innovators and Educators: Opportunities and Challenges for Modern Universities’. Guest speaker Professor Peter Høj, Vice-Chancellor and President of the University of Queensland (UQ) was joined by Professor Frank Griffin, Vice-Chancellor of UPNG.

Professor Høj said that through robust, rigorous and timely research and sustained policy engagement, universities can be a key source of ideas and insights on the policy priorities that impact on PNG and neighbouring nations in the Pacific region.

“Universities should provide knowledge leadership. In fact, the vision for the University of Queensland (UQ) is ‘Knowledge Leadership for a Better World,” he said.

Professor Peter Høj answers a question from the audience.

At UQ, we have a Centre for Policy Futures, which works closely with governments, international organisations, and key stakeholders to pursue a vibrant research program focused on independent and peer-reviewed research, as well as commissioned reports, discussion papers, and policy briefs,” said Professor Høj.

“There are opportunities for PNG universities to serve a similar role, to engage in public policy debate, and to challenge and influence the development of public policy in health and education.

Professor Frank Griffin, agreed with this vision, stating “Our university should be a hub of knowledge – a think tank utilised for drafting and designing policies with academics who are leading their respective fields.

These experts have a unique insight in how certain policies should be designed, and in that regard UPNG can be a useful member of society in terms of assisting the government with policy development.”

Professor Høj emphasised the need for innovators to partner with industry, government and the community to “ensure we meet societal needs and their most pressing challenges.”

Professor Griffin reiterated the value of partnerships and outlined the exciting work that UPNG is undertaking with the resources sector and other private industry partners to ensure that UPNG is meeting the skill demands of industry now and in the future.

A UPNG student asks a question on disability access at universities.

Professor Høj discussed the potential of universities to embrace opportunities to partner with government agencies directly to improve leadership capacity and policy development.

“Consideration of current capacity gaps, succession planning and the implications of an ageing workforce – are areas where a program can have the most impact – delivering skills-based training and peer-to-peer learning, academic coursework and other methods to increase the cadre of ethical and skilled professionals in leadership roles in the PNG public sector,” he said.

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen series of public discussions explore themes and policy issues relevant to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

Supported by the PNG-Australia Partnership, the series follows on from last year’s popular APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct, which was attended by more than 3,500 people and broadcast on television and radio to a potential audience of four million people.



Categories
News and Information

Discussion series continues to encourage ‘Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen’

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series continues with an event on opportunities and challenges for modern universities.

PUBLIC DISCUSSION SERIES
Innovators and Educators: Opportunities and Challenges for Modern Universities

Date: Thursday 1 August 2019
Time: 4:30pm for a 5pm start
Venue: New Lecture Theatre, The University of Papua New Guinea

The keynote speaker is Professor Peter Høj AC, Vice-Chancellor and President, University of Queensland.

Joining him for a panel discussion are Professor Frank Griffin, Vice-Chancellor, The University of Papua New Guinea and Ms Lesieli Taviri, CEO, Origin Energy PNG.

Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen is supported by the PNG–Australia Partnership and will continue through 2019 to explore themes and policy issues pertinent to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

 

Categories
Announcements

Applications open for Australia Awards In-PNG Scholarships 2020

Australia Awards In-PNG Scholarships are prominent awards offered by the Australian Government in partnership with the Government of Papua New Guinea to support service delivery in health, education and transport. Through study, research and practical training in PNG, scholarship recipients develop the knowledge and skills to drive change and to make positive contributions to social and economic development.

Find out more by visiting the links below:

Study in PNG

https://www.australiaawardspng.org/study-in-png/midwifery

https://www.australiaawardspng.org/study-in-png/nursing

https://www.australiaawardspng.org/study-in-png/PrimaryTeaching

http://www.australiaawardspng.org/study-in-png/maritime

Categories
Events News and Information

Australia Future Unlimited: Education Roadshow 2019

The 2019 Australia Future Unlimited: Education Roadshow will showcase leading and top ranked Australian Universities and colleges in four regional centres.

The roadshow will provide opportunities for the visiting tertiary institutions to meet with potential full fee paying students, sponsors, current and prospective partners and alumni.

In attendance will be secondary schools and colleges from Australia, TVET institutions and Australian university representatives.

The event is aimed intending applicants for future Australia Award scholarships, potential private students from secondary school to post-graduate levels. It may also be of interest to managers seeking information on training and courses available for staff.

 


PORT MORESBY – Hilton Hotel | Saturday, July 20th 9:00am – 12:00pm – Open session (Through Registrations only).
1:00pm – 3:00pm – Open session (Through Registrations only)

KOKOPO – Gazelle International Hotel | Monday, July 22nd 9:00am – 12:00pm – Open to general public.
1:00pm – 4:00pm – Open to general public.

LAE – Lae International Hotel | Wednesday, July 24th 9:00am – 12:00pm – Open session (Through Registrations only).
1:00pm – 4:00pm – Open session (Through Registrations only).

GOROKA – University of Goroka | Thursday, July 25th 1:00pm – 4:00pm – Open to general public.


Who will attend from Australia?

  • Leading and top ranked Australian Universities and colleges.

Who should attend?

  • Full fee paying students and potential private students from Secondary School to Post Graduate levels.
  • CEOs and HR / Training Managers seeking information on courses available for staff. Including provincial governments offering scholarships in their provinces.
  • Universities and training institutions looking at partnering with these universities and colleges.

For more information or to register, please contact Alu Tauna
Phone: 325 9150 | Email: Alu.Tauna@austrade.gov.au
Or register online: https://www.studyinaustralia.gov.au/events for Port Moresby and Lae participants.

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration

Modern infrastructure marks new era at historic training institute

Then and now: the library will continue to be a centre for the development of future leaders.

In 2018, the public sector training centre formerly known as the Administrative College and the Institute of Public Administration re-emerged as the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance.

The Institute holds an important place in Papua New Guinea’s history books as the home of the Bully Beef Club – the group of some of the nation’s first leaders, including its most famous member Grand Chief Sir Michael Somare.

The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance (or PILAG) is focused on continuing that tradition – supporting emerging public service leaders to fulfil their potential and shape the future of the country.

PILAG chief executive Michael Barobe and Acting Personnel Management Secretary Taies Sansan arrive at the library opening.

PILAG chief executive Michael Barobe said he is optimistic that the revitalised institute will deliver on its promise and provide a boost to public sector performance.

“The transition to the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance was much more than a change of name – it was the start of a new era,” he said.

“Our vision is to forge a new generation of future leaders who have the skills and knowledge to do their jobs effectively, ethically and inclusively.

“We are taking contemporary approaches to developing public servants’ core skills and the tools they require to be values-based leaders.

The shift has seen strengthened internal capacity, new courses developed and the construction of high-quality, modern infrastructure, supported by the Australian Government through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

PILAG is one of the core institutions of the Precinct, and the new buildings – the library and Sir Sere Pitoi Rumana – are symbols of the enduring partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia.

Deputy Prime Minister Davis Steven and Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne officially open the library.

The new library, which replaced the original building gifted by the local governments of Australia in 1966, was opened on 18 June by Hon. Davis Steven MP, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Justice and Attorney General, and Senator the Hon. Marise Payne, Australia’s Foreign Minister and Minister for Women.

Inside, the open plan layout provides a positive learning environment with functional teaching and tutorial spaces, including a large seminar room for more than 40 people.

The library has a special collections room with temperature controlled space for the preservation of invaluable historical books and archival materials.

It is also equipped with the latest library information technology and has been designed to be accessible to people with disabilities.

Last year, the Institute celebrated the opening of Sir Sere Pitoi Rumana – a new administrative wing named in honour of one of the first Papua New Guineans to take on a top public service position.

It includes the Bully Beef Wing which fittingly pays tribute to the Bully Beef Club and honours the connection with the founding leaders of Papua New Guinea.

Mr Barobe believes the buildings will be the catalyst for a new era at the Institute with increased engagement with more collaboration with government agencies to train public servants throughout the country.

“The world-class infrastructure has an impact on teaching, learning and research – it’s an incentive for people to be trained here,” he said.

“It has brought a new culture and new attitude – we are embracing the changes that are taking place and developing courses that are driven by the demands of the modern PNG public service.

“We are also reaching out to our subnational public servants in the provinces and districts, with the support of the Australian Government through the Precinct.”

Inclusion is at the heart of the design of the new buildings and Mr Barobe believes they create a positive environment for staff, students and the surrounding communities.

The library is now open to the general public who can become members.

“These are buildings for bringing people together and inclusive learning opportunities,” he continued.

“Previously, all the doors were closed and everyone was separated. Now, here, it’s all open.

“This place is an icon of our unity.”

Categories
Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen

New discussion series encourages PNG’s free-thinkers

UPNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Frank Griffin and Chancellor Robert Igara.

The University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) will continue its historic role as a centre of debates on topics of national importance with a new series of public discussions.

The Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen discussion series will commence on Tuesday 2 July at UPNG’s new lecture theatre and give Papua New Guineans their say on important national issues.

UPNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Frank Griffin said he is excited about hosting Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen and believes giving people a chance to be heard is beneficial for society.

“UPNG is a space that encourages free-thinkers and discussion on the issues and topics that society faces now,” he said.

“Everybody has the right to be heard and if we are able to convey that approach of communication then we are serving the purpose for which the University was built.”

Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen picks up from last year’s popular APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct.

The series builds on the success of last year’s APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct, which was attended by more than 3,500 people and broadcast on television and radio to a potential audience of four million people.

The topic for the first discussion is ‘Male Champions of Change: Partners in the push for gender equality’.

The keynote speaker is Elizabeth Broderick, UN Special Rapporteur and Independent Expert on discrimination against women and Founder of Male Champions of Change

She will be joined for a panel discussion by Serena Sasingian, CEO, Digicel Foundation; Dr Eric Kwa, Secretary, Department of Justice and Attorney General; and Chris Moraitis, Secretary, Australian Attorney-General’s Department.

Professor Griffin said that women and men need to work side-by-side and acknowledge the qualities of individuals.

“Working together allows the country to move in a direction where gender equity and gender equality will become more prominent in the years to come,” he said.

“To be a free thinker, at the university level, it doesn’t matter if you are male or female.

“It’s not about right and wrong – it’s that things can be talked about and common ground is found as a result of those open discussions.”

The University of Papua New Guinea’s new lecture theatre is an ideal venue for discussions of national importance.

Professor Griffin said the discussion series also presents an opportunity for students to expand their perspectives.

“I’m looking forward to hearing what people have to say and sensitise the students to thinking outside the box,” he continued.

“Many of these kids have come through systems that are very structured, but when you come to a university it allows you to open up your mind and think about issues in a different way.

“That ability to be free-thinkers and appreciate other ways of doing things becomes very important if the students want to be able to work and communicate well in the outside world.”

Toktok Bilong Strongim Nesen is supported by the PNG–Australia Partnership and will continue through 2019 to explore themes and policy issues pertinent to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

Categories
Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

New UPNG library boosts future leaders

Benedict David and Professor Frank Griffin open new library in the School of Business.

A state of the art library was opened at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) recently – providing a boost to academic research and a modern learning environment for future leaders.

The new library is housed in UPNG’s new School of Business & Public Policy, which was constructed with support from the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The library was ceremonially opened by UPNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Frank Griffin and Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor Benedict David.

Mr David said the new library and School of Business will support UPNG to continue its proud tradition of producing graduates who are technically skilled and capable leaders.

“UPNG has been at the heart of shaping Papua New Guinean leaders for more than 50 years and we are proud to support this to continue through the PNG-Australia Partnership,” he said.

The library is filled with books and digital resources.

“The quality of these facilities reflects the ambitions of the University and its place as one of the core institutions of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

“It is a hub for future generations of economic and public policy experts, and a symbol of the strong partnership between our two countries.”

The new library is a branch of the existing Sir Michael Somare Library and provides modern spaces for research, discussion and collaboration.

It is equipped with more than 3,000 books and also provides students and staff access to a range of online databases.

Molly Woko, a technician at the new library, said she shares her expertise with staff and students to fully utilise the new facilities, which can enhance their research and learning.

Librarian Molly Woko believes the library will modernise learning and research for staff and students.

“It is important for the SBPP to have a library due to the changes in academic environment and the increasing number of students,” she said.

She said, “This new library will enhance learning, teaching and research and most importantly information can be easily accessed when needed and I am privileged to be part of that learning process for students and staff through the my line of work.”

Members of the Precinct’s governing bodies were also in attendance, including Archbishop Douglas Young, Fr Jan Czuba, Jean Kekedo, Serena Sumanop and Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai.

Categories
Future Leaders Program Precinct Leadership Program

An emerging leader in the fight against TB

With 25 years’ of health sector experience Galeva Sere knows how important operations are to a functional hospital.

The surgical facemasks permanently affixed to staff on the wards at Daru General Hospital are a constant reminder that they are at the epicentre of the fight against tuberculosis (TB).

With nearly three decades of experience in the health sector, Galeva Sere understands all too well that keeping a hospital running smoothly is a matter of life and death.

In 2017, Galeva took on the position of corporate services director at the hospital. It was her first foray in to management and, having spent 25 years’ on the clinical side of the sector, she knows how important operations are to a functional hospital.

“It’s very challenging work,” Galeva said, “The staff have different responsibilities and different levels of experience – some are still learning.”

“Previously the hospital functioned at the level of a health centre, but things changed because of the TB – there were more patients and a greater demand for doctors.

“We have to make sure the standards at the hospital are kept up and that doctors have all the materials they need.”

Galeva’s areas of responsibility include human resources, accounts and budgeting, maintenance, transport, security and hygiene – all central to keeping the hospital operational, and ensuring the safety of patients and staff.

Her appointment was part of a process of revitalisation, led by Chief Executive Officer Orpah Tugo, which has seen the facility upgraded to a level five hospital.

The number of staff tripled under the new structure and Galeva, with ever increasing responsibilities thrust upon her, was selected to take part in the Future Leaders Program to support her professional growth.

The Future Leaders Program was launched in 2017 as part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct and is specifically designed to strengthen the core skills of emerging public sector leaders.

Galeva felt her participation was timely and provided an opportunity to develop her leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development skills.

“The Future Leaders Program gave us light on how to manage our areas and be responsible for our duties,” she said.

“It was very helpful and very challenging. We enhanced our skillsets and were given tools to be more competent and thoughtful in addressing issues.”

The nine-month program is supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership and Galeva attended three intensive training blocks in Port Moresby, which were run by the University of Queensland and local training partners.

On each trip to the nation’s capital she undertook coursework and, perhaps as important, shared experiences and collaborated with public sector peers from around the country.

Public servants from the health sector have represented nearly half of all Future Leaders Program (FLP) participants. The majority of Galeva’s FLP peers were from health sector agencies in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, East New Britain, East Sepik, Madang, Manus, Milne Bay, New Ireland, Southern Highlands, West New Britain, Western and Western Highlands.

“There were opportunities to meet others and exchange ideas – this included having lecturers that came from different disciplines, departments and countries – I learned so much in there.”

“I also learned about the importance of networking and partnerships – in terms of sharing ideas, knowledge and skills.

“Working together, we improved our ways of planning strategically, managing projects and dealing with stakeholders.”

As part of the FLP, participants were also tasked to create their own projects to apply back at their workplaces and create positive change within their organisations.

Operations staff, such as hygienists and cleaners, are vital for keeping the hospital environment clean and safe for employees and patients.

Galeva immediately saw the opportunity to ensure the clinical risks related to infection control at Daru General Hospital were being addressed – a topic particularly pertinent given the very real TB threat faced each day by hospital staff.

“My workplace project is to ensure that critical risks related to infection control are properly addressed and managed at Daru General Hospital,” Galeva said.

“I have to implement risk management – improving the quality of patient care and the well-being of our staff.

“I drafted a TB policy that has been circulated for input and improvement from a variety of stakeholders, including the Department of Health. That’s something that we are happy has taken place.”

The infectious nature of TB and the severe consequences of contraction mean that cleaning and hygiene are vital at Daru General Hospital.

“When it comes to risk it’s not just about clinical staff – it’s about the hygienists too – and that’s my area of responsibility,” she continued.

“It’s all about detail – they need to know how to clean the wards and even wear appropriate attire.”

The way Galeva engages with staff is different now. She’s more patient and encourages them to see the bigger picture.

“They are important and have a role to play in the hospital,” she said. “We have to make sure there is safety in the environment. We are moving faster and being more creative and innovative in our ideas.

“The staff now know what is required of them and can see the positive results. They are taking ownership – it’s their workplace, their hospital and their people.”

Galeva believes the Future Leaders Program enabled her to work more effectively as a manager and be an inspiration as a leader in the fight against TB.

Daru is one of the highest TB burden areas in Papua New Guinea and cases of the extremely-drug resistant TB have also been diagnosed in this area; around 500 new cases are detected each year. TB patients require medication for almost two years.

The Australian government through the Papua New Guinea-Australia partnership has supported improved treatment in Western Province through the establishment of five outreach posts on Daru Island to improve community-based treatment in South Fly and also in Middle Fly.

This improved community-based treatment has seen an increase in the number of people completing their treatment – from around 65 per cent in 2014 to 99 per cent in 2018.

Australia is committed to working with the PNG Government in its response to TB in Western Province and the rest of PNG. 

Categories
Future Leaders Program

Cathy takes the lead on inclusive education

Cathy Sowi is putting her learning in to practice as a Future Leaders Program graduate.

Cathy Sowi’s career has revolved around creating better opportunities for children living with disabilities.

The 42-year old from Kubalia in East Sepik Province is single-minded in her determination to create better opportunities for kids across Papua New Guinea, especially those living with disabilities, a journey she began as a primary school teacher specialised in disability services.

She taught for four years before joining the special education sector to work at resource centres in Wewak, Goroka and Port Moresby, assisting firsthand with the challenges faced by children living with disabilities.

While tutoring special education courses in the Highlands, she took up a Bachelor of Education at the University of Goroka and graduated in 2015, which led to an opportunity to join the National Inclusive Education Unit at the Department of Education in Port Moresby.

Cathy’s role is to improve teacher training and enhance the education of young people with disabilities – ensuring teachers in resource centres receive training they need to fully support children aged 3-12 attain standard basic education. Cathy also works with teachers at all levels of education to improve inclusive education for students.

“I believe it’s the best decision I’ve made because from where I’m sitting now my reach is wider,” Cathy said.

“It’s fun working with children and seeing learning take place. This gives me job satisfaction.”

Cathy now supports resource centres working with children living with disabilities, including four in the National Capital District and 19 in regional areas around the country. The centres ensure teachers are well resourced and trained to deliver basic education to these children.

Her dedication didn’t go unnoticed and in 2018 she was selected to participate in the Future Leaders Program through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable leaders.

The Future Leaders Program provides training that is vocational, tailor-made for Papua New Guinea’s public sector and offers a pathway for public servants to make the step up to decision making positions.

Cathy believes the intensive program, which was delivered over a nine-month period, boosted her ongoing work with resource centres to provide more inclusive access to education.

“The Future Leaders Program has been very enriching for me,” she said.

“It has enhanced the way I network and work with stakeholders for more impact.”

A critical component of the Future Leaders Program is a major project that requires participants to apply their learning in the workplace, bringing benefits to both individual and organisation.

Cathy used this opportunity to assess inclusive education programs implemented by three primary schools in the National Capital District and was able to secure 23 Elementary Standard Based Curriculum (SBC) kits for resource centres around the country. This included making links with colleagues in the Curriculum Development Unit and service providers after presenting at a workshop with inclusive education teachers.

“All our resource centres now have SBC kits. This is already a positive step because our teachers are teaching the same curriculum the Department has developed,” she said.

“We are now assisting with teaching and learning materials, teaching strategies and training our teachers on how they can modify and adapt the contents of the SBC kits to suit the needs of the children with disabilities.

“I’m not hoping for big things to happen overnight. I’m happy because I love what I’m doing – it’s part of my job and I can already see improvements taking place at a small-scale and that’s the way to go.”

With the successful completion of her project Cathy showed how to put course theory in to practice.

She is one of 132 public servants who have completed the Future Leaders Program since it was launched in 2017. Women have represented more than half of this number and two-thirds of participants were from provincial and district levels.

The challenging and engaging course program comprised of skills-based training, peer-to-peer learning, participatory exercises, class discussions and academic course work – all aimed at strengthening core public service skills, including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development.

Training was only part of the program and, as with all Precinct activities, it encouraged the sharing of experiences, networking and collaboration.

The Future Leaders Program is run as collaboration between Precinct partners: the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance, the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy and the University of Queensland, and with guidance from the Department of Personnel Management.

It is also underpinned by key PNG Government policies – the Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework, and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy.

Cathy and several other Future Leaders Program participants from the Department of Education have planned to conduct in-house training for staff on the principles ingrained in these policies, sharing their learning within the organisation.

“Am I honest, accountable, respectful, responsible, and am I using my wisdom? Do I act with integrity?” Cathy said, rhetorically echoing the Leadership Capability Framework.

“Coaching and mentoring are very helpful, and I found the six key leadership values challenging. These lessons have helped me a lot,” said Cathy.

Cathy’s drive, perseverance and leadership will see further improvements to inclusive educational practices in Papua New Guinea.
No matter the challenges that come with her role, Cathy believes she is in the right spot and doesn’t plan to stop moving forward now.

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PNG Institute of Public Administration

PILAG training focuses Milne Bay leaders on economic development

Milne Bay public servants celebrate the completion of the PILAG training with CEO Michael Barobe (fourth from left).

Milne Bay public servants are ready to support local communities and businesses after graduating from the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance’s (PILAG) subnational training last week.

The intensive program was the first for 2019 and saw 30 public servants come together in Alotau to strengthen core public sector and leadership skills.

Michael Barobe, PILAG Chief Executive Officer, said the Institute is committed to subnational training and programs will be delivered at the provincial, district and local levels throughout the year.

“We are giving public servants across Papua New Guinea the skills, knowledge and confidence to support their communities,” Mr Barobe said.

“No two places are the same – local administrators are best placed to understand the challenges and opportunities faced by people in their districts.

“PILAG is empowering them to make a difference as ethical, capable leaders.”

The district training rollout is part of PILAG’s commitment to supporting the development of leaders who can drive improved service delivery and economic development.

The participants included representatives from Agaun, Alotau, Bolubolu, Bubuleta, Dobu, Esa’ala, Fifebay, Garuahi, Gogosiba, Goilanai, Gurney, Huhu, Losuia, Misima, Murua, Rabaraba, Samarai. Tagula and Weraura.

Siobi Eugene believes ethical, capable leaders can make a difference for regional communities.

Course participant Siobi Eugene, a business development officer in Alotau District, said the training will result in better projects for local communities.

“The course gave us the skills, knowledge and tools to better manage projects and secure funding for programs,” he said. “These are vital to increase economic and employment opportunities.”

“We have the ability to manage the funds efficiently and effectively, and ensure we are ethical, responsible and transparent in our workplaces.

“During the course we designed new projects – I’m proposing economic development programs that look at rice and cocoa. I want to look at supporting clans to organise and unleash the potential of their land – agriculture is vital for food security and also important for economic development locally.”

The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance – formerly known as the AdCol and PNGIPA – is committed to the development of public service leaders and meeting the training needs of government agencies.

More than 400 public servants across eight provinces have now benefited from the PILAG district training rollout, which is supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

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Future Leaders Program

Future leaders training kicks-off for 2019

Future leader: Rayleen Wally from the East Sepik Provincial Health Authority.

Emerging public service leaders have commenced a nine-month leadership training program that will ready them to step-up as decision-makers.

The first group of Future Leaders Program participants for 2019 began training on 25 February to develop core public service skills – including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development.

The Future Leaders Program is part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable leaders.

It is led by the Department of Personnel Management and Acting Secretary Taies Sansan said the Future Leaders Program was designed specifically for up and coming public sector leaders in PNG.

“We are empowering emerging leaders from all over Papua New Guinea with the tools they need to make a difference for the country,” Ms Sansan said.

“The Future Leaders Program is underpinned by the principles of ethical leadership, gender equity and social inclusion. Participants are selected because they have demonstrated commitment to these values and shown potential as leaders.

“The course is intense and graduates from previous years are now reaping the rewards by applying their learning back in their organisations.”

Since 2017, the Future Leaders Program has been completed by 132 public servants, with two-thirds from the provincial and district levels.
One of the past participants was Rayleen Wally, an accounts examiner with the East Sepik Provincial Health Authority, who said the course was very timely for her as a young public servant still finding her voice.

“To be good, productive public servants – assets in the public sector – we have to face challenges and overcome difficult situations.”

“This course has taught me how to change behaviors, attitudes and practices – how to work cooperatively, achieve the organization’s goals and contribute to the country as a whole.

“The Future Leaders Program is based on ethical values and principles in the workplace. We need to uphold those values for a better public sector workforce and service delivery to the people.”

All participants in the current course work in the health sector, including public servants from both provincial offices and central agencies in Port Moresby.

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Australian National University UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Top UPNG students return from summer school in Australia

Olivia Kakalave (second right), and the 2019 ANU-UPNG Summer School students in front of Parliament House in Canberra.

In January, a group of 10 high-achieving undergraduates from the University of Papua New Guinea’s (UPNG) School of Business & Public Policy – attended a summer school program at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra.

The summer school program is part of the partnership between the two universities and is aimed at enhancing Business and Public Policy learning for UPNG students, and strengthening the people-to-people links at the tertiary academic level.

Under this partnership ANU academics are attached each year at UPNG to teach economics and public policy subjects to UPNG Business and Public Policy students.

Olivia Kakalave, a public policy management student who is now in her final year of studies was among those who attended the summer school program in January.

She said the partnership has been beneficial for her over the course of her studies and that the summer school program was enlightening.

“I think it’s a good opportunity for students like myself to be exposed to such programs. If we go out and see what it’s like there, when we come back we can make a difference in the field that we are studying,” she said.

Miss Kakalave said this exposure will build capability and boost students’ self-esteem.

“I’m looking forward to coming back and sharing these ideas with our junior students through our association – we can try to disseminate information, give hope to others and motivate them to make a difference.”

The summer school program consists of coursework to improve critical research skills, and extracurricular events which expose students to new ways of thinking and provide opportunities to build networks.

It inspires students, exposes them to new intellectual challenges, and strengthens their critical thinking and academic capabilities.The ANU-UPNG partnership and the summer school program are supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The summer school program consists of coursework to improve critical research skills, and extracurricular events which expose students to new ways of thinking and provide opportunities to build networks.

It inspires students, exposes them to new intellectual challenges, and strengthens their critical thinking and academic capabilities.

The ANU-UPNG partnership and the summer school program are supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

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Australian National University UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

INFOGRAPHIC: ANU-UPNG Summer School

Some of the best and brightest students from the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) travelled to Canberra in January and February to enhance their studies on a summer school program at the Australian National University (ANU).

The ANU-UPNG partnership and the summer school program are supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

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News and Information

INFOGRAPHIC: International Day of Education

Education is a lifelong pursuit and the Papua New Guinea–Australia Partnership is supporting public servants to continue their personal and professional growth as ethical, capable leaders through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct at the University of Papua New Guinea.

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PNG Institute of Public Administration Press Releases

Local leaders boosted by district training

Melinda Yalingu, Rural Development Officer in a group work and discussion with fellow course participants during a Financial Management session.

Papua New Guinea’s public servants have boosted their leadership skills with the nationwide rollout of Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance’s district training program.

More than 300 public servants have been trained in key public sector skills in 2018 – including project management and financial management – better enabling them to deliver services to their communities.

Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore said the revitalised Institute is committed to enhancing public sector performance throughout Papua New Guinea.

“The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance is focused on training ethics and values-based leaders who can drive improved service delivery and economic development,” Mr Kapavore said.

“Its courses meet the needs of the central agencies, and public servants working at the provincial, district and local-levels.”

The district rollout is supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that supports the development of public sector leaders.

“The Precinct is building the capacity of current and emerging public sector leaders – working at an academic level, through vocational training and by encouraging discussion about important topics,” Mr Kapavore said.

“It is one of the mechanisms we are using to develop the capacity of the public service – to make it more efficient, effective and ethical.”

The training rollout also brought public servants from different districts and provinces together to build networks, share experiences and collaborate on solutions to regional development challenges.

District and local-level public servants have now benefited from courses run in East New Britain, East Sepik, Morobe, Southern Highlands, West Sepik and Western Highlands.

One of the course participants was Melinda Yalingu, a Rural Development Officer in Morobe Province, who said she is committed to using the training to build up local agriculture projects in Nawaeb.

“Our role as public servants is to improve the sustainability and livelihoods of the people in the districts,” Ms Yalingu said.

“I want to see projects through from start to finish to the benefit of our local farmers and the community as a whole. We can train our farmers in financial management, sustainability, gender equity and social inclusion, and sharing responsibility.”

Brian Mogu, Special Projects Officer, Huon-Gulf District.

Brian Mogu, Special Projects Officer with the Huon Gulf District, is in his 44th year of public service and said project management and financial management are important, practical courses.

“It has given me confidence and broadened my ability to manage, operate and maintain the subjects that were taught,” he said.

“I believe field officers in all divisions in agriculture, fisheries, clerks, and even for the Local Level Government and District administrators are now better prepared to carry out their duties in the field,” he said.

“The focus and mindset of the officers are now geared towards the local population. They have to be there to make sure that those people are served and development and services can flow in.”

Brian graduated with a Diploma in Public Administration and Middle Management from the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance (then-Administrative College) in 1977 and said the recent courses have refreshed his skills.

“With the reforms came new systems and these courses have broadened my knowledge,” he said.

“It has given me the confidence to do my job efficiently and proficiently under set laws and acts of the public service.”

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Gender Press Releases

Natalie and her girls break down barriers to construct a legacy

Photo Left-to-right: Wasimaelo, Natalie and Sarah-Kristine Romney.

Things were not always easy for Natalie Romney when she first entered the construction industry, a sector that has been largely male dominated, but the SBS Electrical Fire Services Manager is unfazed by stereotypes and lets her ability do the talking.

The 50-year old from Boianai and Rabe in Milne Bay Province grew up with her brother and sister, and, looking back, Natalie realises how hard her parents worked to provide for them.

“I really appreciate what they did for us and I can say that I had a happy and stable childhood,” Natalie recalled.

Natalie started school in Lae, then moved to Fiji with her family before returning to PNG to complete her secondary education in Port Moresby.

The single mother of two girls enjoys watching movies, reading and singing, but when she’s at work her mind is always on the job.

Natalie has always been determined to provide opportunities for her girls, who are now grown-up with careers of their own.

“My focus has always been to do my job well so I can provide for my children,” Natalie said, “that my chosen career happens to be in a male dominated industry is incidental and does not really have any bearing on how I work.”

“It’s a matter of focusing and not being intimidated. It comes down to confidence – knowing what you have to do and ensuring clarity in your instructions to those that report to you but at the same time being respectful in your approach to those you lead – which in turn will gain you their respect.”

Natalie sparked an interest in electricity as a high school student – from that moment she knew she wanted to be an engineer.

In 1992, her dream came true when she graduated from the Papua New Guinea University of Technology (UniTech) with a Bachelor of Engineering and worked for five years with a multi-discipline engineering consultancy firm as a design engineer.

Natalie can now look back on more than 25 amazing years in the construction industry – a career that has included involvement in the creation of some of the country’s most high-profile buildings.

In the late 90s she worked on the landmark Kina Haus (formerly Deloitte Tower), one of the original office towers in downtown Port Moresby. Natalie’s job was to liaise between project managers and senior management.

“Construction is really interesting,” Natalie said, “it’s fun to work as a team and see this building appear that you’ve only seen on drawings.”

“You get to walk into the finished product that you were involved in and worked with the people who put it together. That’s interesting – to see something that’s on paper be built around you.

“One important thing I’ve learnt is to be humble and respectful and always be willing to learn from others because 99 per cent of the time, there’s someone in your team who has more skill, knowledge, expertise and or wisdom than you.”

Natalie is a role model to her two daughters, who have followed her footsteps in to the construction sector.

Her eldest also graduated from UniTech as an electrical engineer and her younger daughter is a drafter, helping to compile documents for complex projects.

Two years ago, an opportunity arose that was beyond Natalie’s wildest dreams – the chance to work alongside her daughters on a project of major significance to Papua New Guinea.

The trio are among more than 300 Papua New Guineans and Australians who worked side-by-side on the University of Papua New Guinea’s new School of Business and Public Policy.

Natalie has now led the SBS Fire Services Division for more than a decade and her eldest daughter, Wasimaelo, helped with the testing process for the fire alarm system as the new School of Business neared completion. She knows her kids have the ability to excel in their roles and is looking forward to seeing more and more Papua New Guineans involved in the management of major projects.

The new School of Business and Public Policy is a symbol of the strong partnership between PNG and Australia.

“For complex projects like this, documentation is really important. Production of the operations and maintenance manuals are a very big part of the project, so both my daughters are involved in that.

“My eldest daughter will liaise with the project managers and others on-site to make sure that the documentation is accurate and the testing is complete and that we’re complying with our requirements.

“It’s quite exciting because they are part of my team too – we’re together 24 hours each day.”

Taiko Lalo, Infrastructure Project Manager from the Australian Government funded Technical Enabling Unit, which implements construction projects, worked alongside Natalie and drew on her experience.

“Natalie has been in the industry a bit longer than myself,” Taiko said, “she has a wealth of experience and being able to work with her has been great.”

“It’s empowering for me because I’d like to see females step up and be part of the bigger picture.”

The School of Business and Public Policy building was constructed with support from the Australian Government, through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct. It is international-standard infrastructure for learning, equipped with modern facilities for teaching, research and collaboration.

Natalie believes the School of Business, the new Lecture Theatre and Student Services Building – all completed this year – complement UPNG’s aim of producing top quality graduates who can meet the demands of the modern day. She said the state of art facilities match what UPNG is trying to achieve.

“I think it’s exciting for the staff and students to see they have a new Lecture Theatre on the other side and now they are going to have this state of the art building,” she continued.

The Precinct, a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia, supports generations of leaders – both women and men – who can develop ethical, practical and intellectual leadership for the nation, and promotes the principles of gender equity and social inclusion.

Natalie believes the new facilities are befitting UPNG’s tradition of producing graduates who play a great role in shaping Papua New Guinea’s future.

“Thousands of students are going to benefit from these, and maybe their children,” she said.

“This is a legacy building.”

In the years to come, Natalie and her daughters will look upon the new School of Business and Public Policy building with pride, knowing they played an important role in its construction.

They might just leave a legacy of their own by breaking down construction industry barriers through their own ability, passion and commitment.

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Precinct Leadership Program Videos

VIDEO: Public Speaking and Speech Writing

Pacific Leadership and Governance course on public speaking and speech writing

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct course on public speaking and speech writing skills is aimed at upskilling public servants and has been delivered in Port Moresby, Kokopo and Vanimo.Over 200 public servants have benefitted from this course since its commencement in June 2017, with over 40 per cent of participants from the provinces.Recently, 52 participants completed this course and are looking forward to putting to use what they have learnt.Watch the video interview

Posted by Australian High Commission Papua New Guinea on Thursday, 6 December 2018

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct course on public speaking and speech writing skills is aimed at upskilling public servants and has been delivered in Port Moresby, Kokopo and Vanimo.

Over 200 public servants have benefitted from this course since its commencement in June 2017, with over 40 per cent of participants from the provinces.

Recently, 52 participants completed this course and are looking forward to putting to use what they have learnt.

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PNG Institute of Public Administration

Morobe public servants determined to lead with ethics and values

Morobe’s public sector leaders believe that ethics and values are crucial for more effective delivery of vital local services, including health care and education.

More than 50 public servants participated in the recent Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct short courses on Ethical Leadership for Decision Making, including 29 who took part in Lae.

Siwan Patiuwatu, Senior Local Government Officer in the Morobe Provincial Administration, said ethical leadership is important for the public service because the office they hold is for the people of Papua New Guinea.

“We are their servants,” he said, “The positions we hold are not our birthrights.”

“We must be accountable, honest and transparent, and it must try to hold value in what we are doing for the people.”

Mr Patiuwatu said the course provided insights on how to ensure local leaders are ethical, capable and have the tools to navigate Papua New Guinea’s cultural complexity.

He said, “PNG has value systems; we have family values, Christian values, and now we are a member of the global community which has its own values – so we try to adopt those global values as well and see where in our family, community and society these global values will be best incorporated.”

“My hope is to encourage our leaders to practice good values, have good thoughts and good planning. I think I am doing the right thing to serve my people when I encourage leaders at Ward or LLG level to be accountable for their decisions,” he said.

More than 1,000 public servants have participated in Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct short courses, with over a third from subnational agencies.

All Precinct activities are underpinned by the PNG Government’s Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework and the core public service values – honesty, integrity, accountability, respect, wisdom and responsibility.

Kaumu Laga, Education Manager for Lae District, said the training demonstrated that he can be a role model for other public servants and contribute to the development of emerging leaders.

“I am inspired by the six values I learnt – honesty, integrity, accountability, responsibility, respect and wisdom,” he said, “I didn’t realise it before, but they are part of my life.”

“They are really relevant, useful and meaningful, and I can adopt these so people can see me as an example and I can lead others as well. Ethical leadership is the right way forward – we need to apply it in our lives to prosper and improve so that services can be delivered effectively,” he said.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

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News and Information

Integral human development inspires debut sculpture at the Precinct

Gazellah Bruder, Nanias Maira and Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis discuss the intricacies of steel sculpture construction.

For two decades Gazellah Bruder, a Port Moresby-based fine artist, has produced fabric prints but held long-term plans to expand her repertoire to sculpture.

There was no time to hesitate when the opportunity arose to submit a concept for the Constitution Walk sculptures, supported by the Australian Government through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The proposal was accepted and, in amongst working full-time and being a single mum, she undertook the intensive seven week process of constructing her enormous debut commission.

Gazellah’s 6-by-3 metre piece, entitled Happy Family, Happy Nation, draws on ‘integral human development’, the first National Goal and Directive Principle enshrined in Papua New Guinea’s Constitution and her own family for inspiration.

 

“Family is the foundation of every society when it comes to good governance and having a happy nation,” she said.

“The sculpture is symbolic of families nowadays – any group of people who can depend on each other – it can be five men, or it can be one mother and two children.

“I’m a single mum with two kids, it may not be ‘conventional’ but it’s a full family as far as I’m concerned.”

In between parenting, printing and sculpting, Gazellah works as creative director at the newly opened PNG Fine Art Gallery.

She believes Papua New Guinean art creates a connection between people and the spaces they occupy – be it an outdoors or in an office.

“Any space works well when there’s elements of tradition and culture in it. We feel ownership, we are attached to it and we feel that is really ours,” she said.

“It may not be where they are specifically from, but people can recognise that it has elements of PNG designs, patterns or symbols. If we see a building and there is no PNG element to it, people don’t feel comfortable with it – they don’t feel drawn to it.”

Gazellah’s concept has been brought to life on the Constitution Walk.

Gazellah is a firm believer that the interpretation of art is subjective. She wants her piece to be interacted with and become the subject of discussion.

“Mine is a very organic shape, it’s rounded,” she said, “we had to bend steel, twist it and hammer it in, and try to create a shape that I thought was suitable for the environment.”

“I want people to touch it, walk up close and take selfies. I want people to take shelter when it’s hot and I want kids to play. You want people to do that – you want to connect with people.

“I was listening to the people,” Gazellah continued, “they said looks like lambs, baby sheep, turtles and some saw it as happy people.”

“It can be anything. You just want people to react to it – negative or positive – you want people to talk about it and, in that way, they become part of your artwork.”

Gazellah is an Arts graduate from UPNG but has held various roles aside from painting; from being a TV children’s program presenter to working in corporate organisations and now to sculpting full time has not only coloured her curriculum vitae – but also has landed herself a big opportunity to give back to the university that she attended – having her art displayed for the community there to enjoy!

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Precinct Leadership Program

Speechmaking course empowers public servants to inspire

Sr Ekaloa Rita Mefaramu is confident the course will enable her to better implement health policies and achieve better outcomes in Gulf Province.

More than 70 public servants from throughout Papua New Guinea have boosted their speechmaking and speech writing abilities, key skills for public sector leaders who can inspire, motivate and improve service delivery.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Public Speaking and Speech Writing course was held last month in Port Moresby and Vanimo, and included participants from central and provincial government agencies.

Sr Ekaloa Rita Mefaramu, Public and Rural Health Extension Services Coordinator at Kerema Hospital in Gulf Province, said the course advanced her skills and confidence.

“We’re able to speak with confidence to the public and tell them the importance of the policies that are in place,” she said.

“When I return back to my province I know that I can speak without fear and without hesitation.

“As a health professional working to improve the health indicators in Gulf Province, this course will help me to implement policies more meaningfully, and achieve the desired results and expectations.”

Ivan Kila, Principle Strategy Officer at the Department of Treasury, said public speaking and speech writing are crucial components of his role.

“It’s something that we do almost every day,” he said, “it’s good to learn that there are templates that have been proven and I can take back to be more effective in my job.”

“For the Treasury Department the vision is to bring services down to the most remote areas.

“It’s really exciting to be part of what’s going on – creating new networks for the betterment of our country.”

The course was led by Australian public relations expert Toby Ralph, and supported by PNG Toastmasters Division Director Monica Toisenegila and by University of Papua New Guinea law lecturer Tapora Isorua.

Teaching was centred on advanced communication skills in public relations and media management, and presenting information clearly in both oral and written form.

The course also focused on knowing one’s audience, writing persuasively, and communicating with influence to convey critical information and motivate action.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that contributes to the development of public sector leaders who are ethical, capable and can deliver improved services for their communities.

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Precinct Leadership Program

Emerging leaders vital for inclusive nation-building

Public servants have, for the first time, joined their private sector counterparts at an intensive program for emerging women leaders, honing their leadership skills to contribute to a more inclusive Papua New Guinea.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct has supported eight women to participate in the Business Coalition for Women’s Certificate IV in Leadership and Management, which is designed to prepare high-potential employees for management roles.

Lesieli Taviri, Chair of the Business Coalition for Women (BCFW), said involvement of women in any decision-making capacity across sectors and the community promotes more inclusive nation-building.

“Higher levels of female participation are closely linked with improved organisational performance,” Ms Taviri said.

“The BCFW leadership program provides targeted training suited for PNG women in the PNG environment and that’s what makes it unique.”

“The diversity of participation from all sectors encourages a wider and more dynamic scope of learning. This exposure benefits the participants; it helps to enhance their thinking and challenges them to apply their learning.”

Priscilla Mais is one of eight public servants working side-by-side with their private sector peers.

Priscilla Mais, Acting Executive Director at the Department of Education, was one of the public servants who commenced the Certificate in March and said the program has boosted her confidence and changed her approach to management.

“I feel empowered and invigorated in my role as a manager, as a team player and as a public servant,” she said.

“Knowing ourselves, our strengths and weaknesses, and how we present ourselves as leaders are all important.”

“The course made me realise that all views are important for a team to work effectively. As leaders, we must be open minded, be open to criticism and be ready to accept different views from different people.”

Ms Mais has led the Department of Education’s Project Management Unit since it was established and wants to work with her team to come up with creative ideas on how to improve the Department, specifically in delivering school infrastructure.

She said the training provided insights in to how small changes can make a large impact on professional and personal development.

“This training has helped me to improve many things which I took for granted,” Ms Mais said.

“Simple things which we do not always see as significant contribute to an effective working environment and, in the end, improved service delivery. This includes courteous telephone manners, being conscious of ethics and codes of conduct, responding positively to clients and listening to views from subordinates.”

“We tend to ignore the small things, but I now see that these small things help us to achieve what we want to achieve – at our workplace and in our personal life.”

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that supports the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

The Business Coalition for Women is a group of companies who are working together to drive positive change for women and businesses in Papua New Guinea.

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Australian National University UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Award-winning academic committed to PNG’s future leaders

Dek with Professor Brian Schmidt, ANU Vice Chancellor and recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics.

When it comes to tutoring emerging economists, there are few with a better pedigree than Dek Joe Sum who – despite being a student himself not long ago – has now won three consecutive awards for excellence in teaching.

Dek is the Australian National University (ANU) – University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) partnership coordinator.

He is one of the five ANU academics based in Port Moresby and who work shoulder-to-shoulder with UPNG staff at the School of Business and Public Policy.

They assist with course development and research agendas, and also teach hundreds of students each year, many of whom will go on to be part of the next generation of economic and public policy experts.

On 12 July, Dek received his third honour in as many years: the ‘Award for Excellence in Tutoring or Demonstrating’ at the 2018 ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in Education.

Dek said the award was the highest recognition for teaching at ANU and that UPNG was the ideal place to share his passion for economics.

“Everyone sees me differently and has a high expectation from me,” Dek said. “It enables me to set a higher standard. It’s good for me and for the students because they can get the most out of me,”

“It’s my passion to teach and I’m honoured because there’s no better place than UPNG to put my skills to use.”

“It’s lot of learning experience and a steep learning curve for me. I’ve never been exposed to that before.”

The partnership between UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy and the ANU has been supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

It has seen the School renew its focus on producing technically skilled and capable leaders who possess the knowledge and ability to create and implement effective policy in the national interest.

Dek is philosophical about the challenges and opportunities Papua New Guinea is presented with, and believes the ANU academics have a role to play in development of leaders who can mold society.

“I love this job because I am directly mentoring the future leaders of PNG,” he said. “I teach them and let them know what opportunities and challenges this country is facing. They can help their country to move forward; build it to be a better place and reward their communities with their knowledge.”

“Our role as lecturers may not be as significant anymore – they will be the champions.”

In the first semester of 2018, ANU lecturers taught economics and public policy management subjects to 291 undergraduate students, and there are signs the partnership has had a major impact on student performance.

There has been a significant increase in the average marks and percentage of students who passed the annual ANU economics exam, which fourth year UPNG students have the option of sitting in addition to their internal examinations.

Each year the top UPNG economics graduate is awarded a scholarship to study for a Master of International and Development Economics at the ANU.

The ANU also receives UPNG economics and public policy students for summer school, which enables them to further their studies and expand their networks.
“Without the current partnership with the Precinct, we would not have been able to do all this – it has greatly benefited students, staff and future leaders,” Dek said.

“Being here, we are able to expand the teaching, research and students’ exposure to the latest economic literature.”

Dek believes that these types of initiatives are promoting more local experts, who are needed to take Papua New Guinea forward.

“I love being in PNG – it is one of the few countries in the world that’s able to preserve its culture so well,” Dek said.

“The ANU Economics Scholarship recipients are the best products of the partnership; they have first class knowledge and are able to combine it with the local understanding. People like us are expatriates; we do not know the culture as well as the locals. With them coming back, there will be a big impact and a sustainable plan for UPNG.”

“Our role as lecturers may not be as significant anymore – they will be the champions.”

Categories
Future Leaders Program

2019 Future Leaders nominations are open

Applications close Wednesday 31 October 2018

Public servants should refer to Circular Instruction Number (19/2018)

Applications are now open to public servants in the National and Provincial Governments for the Future Leaders Program, through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, which will commence in February 2019.

The Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

The Future Leaders Program offers leadership training that is tailor-made for the Papua New Guinea public sector and includes:

  • the opportunity to strengthen core public service skills, including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development;
  • a challenging and engaging course program, with a combination of skills-based training, peer-to-peer learning, participatory exercises, class discussions, academic course work and applied workplace projects; and
  • a fully-funded, nine-month program with 3 x two-week residential learning blocks at the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance in Port Moresby.

For further information and application forms, please contact the Department of Personnel Management (DPM) through:

Mr Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager – Executive Leadership Development Division –
Phone: 327 6326 | Email: ravugamini_vele@dpm.gov.pg

Ms Junelyn Veratau, Executive Leadership Development Officer –
Phone: 327 6407 | Email: junelyn_veratau@dpm.gov.pg

Public servants should refer to Circular Instruction No. 19 of 2018. Completed application forms and relevant documentation must be provided to DPM by close of business on Wednesday 31 October 2018. Late applications will not be accepted.

If there are difficulties submitting your application, you can also send it to courses@pslrpng.org

Selection criteria:

  1. Applicants must be permanent public servants occupying positions from Grades 10 – 14 from the Provinces and Grade 15 – 16 at the National level.
  2. Have five years of relevant work experience, including mid–level management experience.
  3. Recommended and supported by their agency heads to attend the program.
  4. Have demonstrated leadership skills.
  5. Possess a minimum of Grade 10 or Equivalent High School Qualification.
  6. Grade 12 or equivalent High School Qualification desirable.

Required documentation:

  • Completed application forms.
  • Copy of Curriculum Vitae (CV) detailing duties and responsibilities, demonstrating 5 years of relevant work experience including mid-level management experience.
  • Certified copies of academic certificates and transcript for all previous high school and university studies.
  • A letter of recommendation from their agency head.
  • Applications that do not include the required documentation will not be considered.
Categories
Master of Economic and Public Policy UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Master of Economic and Public Policy scholarships open

The Master of Economic and Public Policy continues the University of Papua New Guinea tradition of producing high quality graduates – technically skilled and capable leaders who can apply their qualities in a way that is relevant to Papua New Guinea.

Applications extended to
Wednesday 31 October 2018

Applications are now open to working executives and managers for the Master of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy, which will commence in February 2019.

Ten scholarships for the 2019 academic year are available to middle and senior managers in the PNG public service.

The scholarships are supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia, and cover tuition costs for successful applicants.

The Master of Economic and Public Policy is designed to develop professionals with the knowledge and ability to create and implement effective policy in the national interest.

It provides an academic platform for participants to boost their skills in economic and public policy analysis, which can be applied to the complex range of challenges in PNG today.

The degree was developed through the Precinct partnership between the University of Papua New Guinea and the Australian National University.

Academics from the Australian National University teach subjects as part of the Master of Economics and Public Policy program and support students with research projects.

Scholarships will be awarded to benefit public servants whose work is focused on economic management and the formulation of government policy. They will be managed by the Department of Personnel Management.

For further information and application forms please contact the School of Business and Public Policy through Lisa Marie Kila – Phone: 3267 299 or 3267 305 | Email: sbpp@upng.ac.pg

Online applications are encouraged and must be provided by the close of business on Wednesday 31 October 2018.

Late applications will not be accepted.

Application process:

The University of Papua New Guinea has called for applications for the Master of Economics and Public Policy program with the closing date Wednesday 31 October 2018. You must apply and successfully meet the eligibility criteria, screening and selection process and gain acceptance into the degree program in order for you to be considered for a scholarship. UPNG will provide a list of successful applicants to DPM for consideration and the scholarship will be awarded based on merit and subject to DPM criteria. Successful applicants to the course who do not receive a scholarship offer will be eligible to undertake the course as a full-fee paying student.

PLEASE NOTE: Some return of service obligations may apply as a condition to receive this scholarship.

Selection criteria:

Admission to the degree will be only granted to those who are able to benefit fully from an intensive program. To be considered, applicants should:

  1. have a good first degree in Economics/Public Policy from an approved University or equivalent qualification;
  2. have a minimum of two-year management level work experience acquired after first degree; and
  3. be fluent in English and computer literate.
Categories
UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Top UPNG student lives her economics dream

Jollanda Mathew (second left) poses with her fellow graduates from the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy.

‘Your future is in your hands – you are what you are and where you are because of your decisions; be disciplined and always be optimistic.’

An important reminder and encouragement from Jollanda Matthew – a young tutor at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) who graduated with a Bachelor of Economics in April this year and who has been awarded the Australian National University (ANU) scholarship to pursue a Master’s degree in International and Development Economics in 2019.

Jollanda enjoys reading novels, she is a keen learner and enjoys long conversations with her friends apart from playing netball, however there is a big contrast between her hobbies and her ambitions.

Some people end up in fields very different from their interest – but they stay in a particular field for various reasons whilst some end up doing exactly what they enjoy – they turn their hobby into their career. For Jollanda, as a child her interests were to work in a field that was noble – that involved caring, nurturing, educating and serving.

“I had thoughts of either becoming a nurse, or a teacher or even a flight attendant,” she reveals.

But she was also a practical person – observing and helping her mum and grandma with selling goods at the market ignited an interest in understanding labour and production, the distribution and consumption of goods and services.

Jollanda’s grandfather had a great influence in her career choice – he had a big interest in the economic field and had wanted to become an economist but was not fortunate to make it to tertiary level to study this course, yet he understood how the economy worked and he passed on what he know about this area to Jollanda.

Jollanda Mathew with Dr Manoj Pandey, Australian National University Lecturer, at the 63rd UPNG Graduation.

At a young age, Jollanda’s granddad helped her see how living, whether it is subsistence or commercial living – were all intertwined and that economics is a major factor in people’s decision making.

The knowledge passed onto her, coupled with her efforts in helping her mum and grandma sell their goods opened the pathway to studying economy.

“I often helped my mother and grandmother sell food at the markets when I was little and I always wondered why the price of goods kept increasing, and why K10, although may seem a reasonable amount, could only cater for certain things and not others,” she said.

“As I progressed to high school and national high school and took up economics, I started to gain a bit more understanding of why goods were produced, why there is a cost for labour, for distribution and for production and the practise of barter – exchange of goods and services and purchasing power- how much goods and services can be bought by one unit of money,” she adds.

Studying in Wawin National High School in Lae, Morobe Province was her first move away from her closely-knitted family and her first step towards learning to be independent and the opportunity to understanding more the economics of living.

“At Wawin, I had to learn to manage well my allowances that my parents sent, manage my time and priorities that was the beginning of a clearer illustration of living economically. My father is formally employed with the Works Department in Manus, but he helps my mum to toil the land because he wanted to ensure if my family is well catered for, my siblings and I can continue to attend school and progress onto attaining qualifications that will lend us a job and the cycle goes – the subsistence way of life is still a great supplement to Papua New Guinean families.”

“In my first month at Wawin, my mum would call me each morning to ensure I was up and ready for classes and had not missed breakfast. I was indirectly constantly reminded of the importance of having breakfast, being well to attend classes and to make sure to attend all classes. Being disciplined will get your somewhere in life – idleness will take you nowhere. These thoughts guided me to be grounded in order for me to continue to progress further in my education.”

“At university, I learnt how to interpret some of the issues affecting PNG’s economy, such as the foreign exchange shortage and the unemployment rate and I began to see how economics influenced people’s decision making. Economics is everywhere; the decision whether to study or go out with friends is economics.”

The privilege to pursue further studies brings her closer to fulfilling her dream of becoming an economist and contributing to nation building – a dream her grandfather shares.

“His support and encouragement has pushed me to strive to achieve exceptional results from day one of my studies and I am thankful to him and to my dad for encouraging me to pursue this area of interest.”

Jollanda was among more than 400 students from the School of Business and Public Policy who graduated in April this year.

Jollanda tutors students at the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy.

She and her fellow economics graduates have benefitted throughout their degree from the School’s strong partnership with the ANU’s Crawford School of Public Policy, which is supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The partnership between ANU and the UPNG is supporting the School of Business and Public Policy to become a research hub, enabling academics and students to contribute to the nation’s understanding of the challenges and opportunities it faces.

The ANU lecturers work alongside UPNG staff and contribute to the academic and personnel development of students, encouraging them to be leaders and role-models to their peers.

Jollanda presently tutors nearly 200 first and third year students at the School of Business and Public Policy, a pre-requisite of the ANU Economics Scholarship.

ANU Lecturer Dek Joe Sum was full of praise for Jollanda and her peers at UPNG.

“The Precinct partnership has greatly benefited students, staff and future leaders. Jollanda is working as a tutor right now, accumulating her teaching experience,” he said.

“People like us are expatriates, we do not know the culture as well as the locals. Jollanda and other ANU Scholarship recipients are the best students, who have first class knowledge and are able to combine it with the local understanding.

“With them coming back there will be a big impact and a sustainable plan for UPNG. Our role as lecturers may not be as significant anymore – they will be the champions.”

Jollanda will depart Papua New Guinea next year with 10 third year students to attend an ANU-UPNG Summer School program as part of the partnership between the two institutions.

She will then remain in Australia to take up her master’s studies in 2019, where she will follow in the footsteps of Ani Rova, Maho Laveil and Kelly Samof – the ANU Scholarship awardees currently studying in Canberra.

“The partnership between UPNG and ANU, and my experience with the visiting lecturers, changed the way I think about economics.”

Jollanda aims to return to the School of Business and Public Policy as a lecturer, once she has completed her post-graduate studies.

Categories
APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct Events

Health experts excited by the potential of ‘transformational’ technology

Sir Puka on the panel at the APEC Discussion Series.

Technology has potential to transform primary health care in Papua New Guinea according to local and international experts at a public discussion held during APEC Health Security Week.

The fourth event in the APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct included a keynote speech by Dr Shin Young-soo, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Director, and a panel discussion that featured Hon. Sir Puka Temu CMG KBE MP, Minister for Health and HIV/AIDS, and Dr Vivian Lin, former World Health Organization (WHO) Director for Health Sector Development.

The event coincided with APEC Health Security Week and was the fourth iteration in the series, which has offered unprecedented public access to local and visiting experts on APEC topics – including economic integration agriculture and health.

The conversation was centred on primary health care and the panellists were quick to highlight the relevance of the 2018 APEC theme – ‘Harnessing Inclusive Opportunities, Embracing the Digital Future’ – to health in Papua New Guinea.

Sir Puka said Papua New Guinea has the potential to make a technological leapfrog and cover the country with health care services.

“Harnessing technology is so critical for us,” he said, “in Rwanda they use drones to deliver vaccines at a 300 mile radius – that’s transformational, as long as on-site there’s a health worker that can disperse the vaccine. Tele-health or tele-medicine can be used when an obstetric nurse is having a difficult delivery. The obstetrician is ready in a regional hospital to guide that nurse on how to deliver safely.”

Sir Puka Temu also said the health of people across the country depends on both investment in health services and supporting infrastructure.
“mHeath is not an expenditure item – it is an investment item. We invest in the health of the nation,” he said.

“The bulk of positive health outcomes don’t come from direct health interventions – they come from non-health interventions,” he continued.

In his keynote address, Dr Shin said primary health care is crucially important for health security for all people, but that building these health services is neither easy nor quick.

“It takes time to build and maintain the right physical infrastructure, to train the workforces, and ensure good planning and links to other parts of the health system,” he said.

“Right now there is an outbreak of polio in PNG and this is a perfect example of the need to keep investing in primary health care to ensure that every man, woman and child gets essential services – such as immunisations.

Dr Vivian Lin and Sr Celine Yakasere provide perspectives on the importance of primary health care.

According to the WHO, the rise of mobile of technologies, applications and cellular networks has the potential to improve and permanently alter the way health services are delivered, and Dr Vivian Lin believes innovation can support health workers to communicate successfully with communities.

“Health – apps on the phone – can, in real-time, let you know how many people are waiting at all the emergency departments and what the waiting time is. That helps people actually make choices about where they may go,” Dr Lin said.

Dr Lin also said that community partnerships are vital for formal health care systems to function well.

“One of the really important things about primary health care is that it’s not just about individuals seeking care – it’s about engaging with communities,” she said.

“When people build trust then we can see a much stronger response from the community to a range of health issues.”

The APEC Discussion Series is hosted by the PNG APEC Secretariat and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct. The APEC Series continues on 5 September with an event themed: ‘Women in Leadership’.

Categories
APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct Events

APEC Discussion explores agriculture as a major regional opportunity for PNG

Grahame Dixie, Executive Director at Grow Asia.

The Papua New Guinea public had their say on APEC Food Security week at the third event of the APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct, which was themed ‘Growing the nation: Agriculture, Inclusive Growth and Regional Opportunities’.

The event was held on Tuesday 7 August at the University of Papua New Guinea and included a keynote address from Grahame Dixie, Executive Director of Grow Asia, a multi-stakeholder partnership platform that catalyses action on inclusive agricultural development in South East Asia.

Mr Dixie said PNG can look to examples of South East Asian economies which have been able to kick-start their economic development by initially focusing on increasing the productivity of their smallholder farmers.

“The world is changing rapidly – creating both challenges and opportunities for farming. Agribusinesses need additional supplies of agricultural raw materials to supply the changing, expanding, and largely urban demand,” he said.

“The great opportunity is that agribusinesses have the capacity, through their buying power, to bring significant new sources of cash income into the rural economy – this is the fuel for eliminating rural poverty.”

Mr Dixie pointed to a case from Indonesia, where a coffee industry partnership between a major transnational corporation, nurseries, fertilizer companies, NGOs, certifiers, banks and local traders has lifted farmers’ harvests and improved the prices they receive.

He said this outcome was due to a combination of certification, competition and improved quality, and the tangible impact has been that around 20,000 farmers increased their coffee profits by more than 80 per cent – worth approximately US$12 million per year.

“In PNG the approach of creating and working with multi-stakeholder partners – typically comprising agribusiness, producers, civil society and government – can bring similar benefits,” Mr Dixie said.

“There are problems that cannot be solved by an individual company or institution, but can be tackled cooperatively. “

Joeri Kalwij (centre-left), Jane Ravusiro (centre-right) and Max Puritau (right) provided perspectives on agribusiness and small holder development in PNG.

The event also included a panel discussion that featured Jane Ravusiro, Senior National Coordinator at the Pacific Horticultural and Agricultural Market Access Program (PHAMA); Joeri Kalwij, the Manager of Monpi Coffee Exports Ltd; and Max Puritau, Global Village Exports Managing Director.

The APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct will continue next week on Wednesday 15 August with a discussion centred on APEC Health Security Week and the theme ‘Ensuring the Region’s Health Security through Primary Healthcare’.

It will feature a keynote address by World Health Organization Regional Director Dr Shin Young-soo.

The series was launched in May and gives Papua New Guineans unprecedented access to visiting international experts and the APEC discussions taking place throughout 2018.

It is hosted by the PNG APEC Secretariat and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, supported by the PNG – Australia Partnership, and explores APEC themes and policy issues relevant to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

As the 2018 APEC host, Papua New Guinea will hold approximately 200 meetings with up to 15,000 delegates, including global business and government leaders, policy and technical experts and academics.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical and capable leaders.

Categories
Events

APEC Discussion Series continues: ‘Why APEC matters for PNG?’

The second event of the APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct – ‘Why APEC matters for PNG?’ – will be held at the University of Papua New Guinea’s New Lecture Theatre from 4:30pm-6pm on Thursday 12 July.

The event will feature a keynote address from Carlos Kuriyama, Senior Analyst at the APEC Secretariat in Singapore, and a panel discussion with Ken Waller, Executive Director of the APEC Business Advisory Council, and Lady Aivu Tauvasa, Deputy Chair of Nambawan Super.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP to info@pslrpng.org or 307 2287

Categories
APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct Press Releases

Unprecedented discussion series gives Papua New Guineans access to APEC experts

WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo takes a question from the audience.

The Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Discussion series has given Papua New Guineans unprecedented access to visiting APEC and international trade experts.

A series of public events open to the public will explore APEC themes and policy issues relevant to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

The first event last month featured addresses by Foreign Minister Rimbink Pato; Australia’s Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment Mark Coulton; and World Trade Organization (WTO) Director-General Roberto Azevêdo. Discussions were focused on trade and the rules-based global trading system.

World Trade Organization Director Roberto Azevêdo highlighted Papua New Guinea’s importance to the international trade system, and the importance of international trade in addressing issues faced in PNG, including recovery from natural disasters.

Mr Azevedo said that rigorous studies suggest that the frequency and severity of natural disasters are likely to increase, and WTO members have started a dialogue on how trade policies and practices can help in dealing with natural disasters.

“The right policy can boost recovery by helping to improve supply-side capacity and restoring trade after a disaster. We have to get this right and contribute in any way we can,” he said.

Minister Pato said that the WTO continues to be a major contributor to increased levels of global prosperity. He further stated that the message Papua New Guinea wants to send as APEC host is that the world will be all the better for a steady, free, fair, inclusive, rules-based trading system.

The event also included a panel discussion with Dr Allan Bollard, Executive Director for the APEC Secretariat based in Singapore.

Dr Allan Bollard, reiterated APEC’s focus on ensuring there are good rules for international trade that will translate to improvements in living standards.

“Over the time that Papua New Guinea has been in APEC, since 1993, income per capita has doubled – you are roughly twice as well off as your parents. We want more of it and that’s been the story right around the APEC region – leading the world in terms of trade given growth,” he said.

Australia’s Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment Mark Coulton also spoke at the first APEC discussion series, and said Australia strongly supports Papua New Guinea’s growing economic integration and leadership role in the Asia-Pacific region.

“Both of our economies rely on a strong and open trading environment, and Australia continues to stand for a transparent world trade and investment system based on rules.”

“Australia is very committed to supporting Papua New Guinea as it hosts APEC this year, and we are also committed to supporting the development of PNG’s future public service leaders through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.”

The APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct is being held at the University of Papua New Guinea throughout 2018 hosted by the PNG APEC Secretariat and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, supported by the PNG – Australia Partnership.

Categories
APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct Events

APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct

The Papua New Guinea APEC Secretariat and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct have announced a discussion series that will give Papua New Guineans unprecedented access to visiting international experts and the APEC discussions taking place throughout 2018.

The ‘APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct’ is presented by the PNG APEC Secretariat and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, supported by the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership and hosted by the University of Papua New Guinea.

Papua New Guinea’s APEC Ambassador Ivan Pomaleu said the APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct will look at APEC themes and policy issues that are important to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific. 

“The APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct is a chance for people to engage with international policy experts,” Mr Pomaleu said. 

“The discussions will cover many topics related to APEC including trade, tourism, mining and more. It is an opportunity to explore how international expertise can be applied in Papua New Guinea,” he said 

As the 2018 APEC host, Papua New Guinea will hold approximately 200 meetings with up to 15,000 delegates, including global business and government leaders, policy and technical experts and academics. 

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said Australia is partnering with Papua New Guinea to ensure this is one of the most successful APEC years ever. 

“Papua New Guinea is showcasing its culture, beauty and economic opportunities to the world as the host of APEC 2018. 

“This year is also a chance for Papua New Guinea to take hold of the great trade and investment opportunities that exist in the Asia-Pacific region,” he said.

The first event in APEC Discussion Series at the Precinct will be held on 24 May and feature a keynote address from World Trade Organization Director-General, Roberto Azevêdo.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical and capable leaders.

It fosters discussion and debate on how to improve governance and service delivery at national, provincial and district levels, and encourages values-based decision making in the Papua New Guinea public service.

The venue for the series is the New Lecture Theatre at the University of Papua New Guinea. The University is a core partner of the Precinct and an historic home for discussions on topics of national importance.

The New Lecture Theatre was launched in March and constructed with support from the Australian Government.

To attend the inaugural discussion on 24 May, RSVP to info@pslrpng.org. Attendees are encouraged to arrive at the New Lecture Theatre at UPNG by 4.30pm for the 5pm – 6pm event.

Categories
Events Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Senior PNG and Aus public servants discuss leadership and decentralisation

Acting UPNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Mange Matui, Australian Public Service Commissioner John Lloyd and Acting Department of Personnel Management Secretary Taies Sansan.

Department of Personnel Management Acting Secretary Taies Sansan and Australian Public Service Commissioner John Lloyd came together for a discussion on ethical leadership and the decentralisation of government functions to regional areas.

The discussion, Leading for the Future – Ethics, Workplace Culture and Leadership in a Decentralised Public Sector, was the first event in the 2018 University of Papua New Guinea Vice-Chancellor’s Lecture Series, and was supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Ms Sansan said decentralisation means public servants in the provinces and districts have a greater role to play in the delivery of services.

“A majority of Papua New Guineans live in regional areas and public servants on the ground are best placed to understand the needs of the community they serve,” she said.

“At the Department of Personnel Management we are strengthening public service leadership at all levels – from central agencies in Port Moresby to the provincial, district and local levels.”

“The Precinct and the newly relaunched Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance are some of the mechanisms we are using to develop the capacity of the public service to make it more efficient, effective and ethical.”

The Department of Personnel Management and the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance maintain strong institutional links with the Australian Public Sector Commission through the Precinct.

Mr Lloyd said good governance and an effective public service is critically important for the stability and success of every country.

“Like the PNG public service, the Australian Public Service delivers many community services and buys goods worth billions of dollars,” he said.

“As public servants, all of us must carry out our duties with honesty, integrity, accountability, respect and responsibility.”

“Our leaders must lead by example and demonstrate the highest standards for others to emulate.”

The Department of Personnel Management, Australian Public Service Commission and Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance, through the Precinct, have run courses in East New Britain, East Sepik, Madang and Southern Highlands, reaching nearly 200 public servants.

The Precinct also supports the partnership between the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy and the Australian National University.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

 
Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration

Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance launched

The Australian High Commissioner and Public Service Minister launch the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance.

The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance was launched in Port Moresby on Tuesday 1 May by Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore and the Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis.

Minister Kapavore said the new Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance (formerly called the Institute of Public Administration and the Administrative College) is committed to the development and training of high-performing public servants throughout Papua New Guinea.

“The launch of the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance represents much more than a change of name – it means the restructure and continued revitalisation of this historic institution,” he said.

He said the Institute is focused on enhancing public sector performance and will forge public servants who will provide the practical, intellectual and ethical leadership for Papua New Guinea.

“The institute is also extending training beyond Port Moresby, ensuring provincial, district and local level public servants are empowered to support their communities,” said the Minister.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said the launch marks the start of a new era for the Institute, which is a core partner of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

“The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance is a vital part of the Precinct, a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting Papua New Guineans to fulfil their potential as ethical and capable leaders,” he said.

“It has an important place in the history of Papua New Guinea as the home of the Bully Beef Club – the group of students, including Sir Michael Somare, who went on to become some of the first leaders of the nation. The Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance will continue that tradition of producing leaders who can shape the future of Papua New Guinea and the region.”

The Institute will continue its strong partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission, supported by the Precinct, which has assisted with training and course design. This includes the new Diploma of Leadership and Governance that will commence next week.

The Precinct has also supported the construction of the Sir Sere Pitoi Rumana; a new administration building; and a new resource centre to provide staff and students access to modern information technology services.

Categories
Gender

Male advocates ready to champion gender equity

Participants discuss terminologies around gender-based violence and in-equality at the Male Advocacy training.

Male public servants have committed to taking a leadership role in responding to and preventing gender-based violence in the workplace.

This follows a four-day Male Advocacy Training program from April 3-6 which 15 male public servants participated in, to better understand the role they can play in addressing this pressing issue.

Jack Wale, Database Manager and Business Analyst at the Internal Revenue Commission, said the training helped him see the importance of the role of men in addressing gender issues.

“At the Internal Revenue Commission we are trying to make the workplace safe and secure for our female staff,” Mr Wale said.

“This training has given me first-hand knowledge on the impact of gender inequality and gender-based violence and how to respond to these challenges.

Australian High Commission Counsellor for Education and Leadership Suzanne Edgecombe (seated second from right) with the male advocates.

I have two daughters and it made me consider how I want my girls to be treated – to be free to succeed in whatever they want to do.”

Gotch Mou, Principal Advisor – Employment Conditions and Industrial Relations at the Department of Prime Minister and National Executive Council said the practice of gender equity and social inclusion can improve the office environment and performance.

“The training addressed misconduct and negative attitudes in the workplace, including sexual advances, playfulness and unwanted attention between male and female colleagues,” Mr Mou said.

“We broke down the meaning of gender related issues at the workplace. I can now use these correctly in my work when dealing with issues or report writing.”

Acting Secretary of the Department of Personnel Management, Taies Sansan, said the National Public Service has a vital role to play on gender issues.

“Gender-based violence and gender inequality are major challenges for Papua New Guinea,” she said.

“As public servants, we have a responsibility to show leadership in changing attitudes and behaviours – both in the workplace and in the community.

At the Department of Personnel Management we are empowering women by ensuring equitable access to training and merit-based appointments, and we are supporting strong male advocates who can champion change.”

The training program was supported by the Australian Government in partnership with the Government of Papua New Guinea through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct to support the development of ethical and capable public sector leaders in the country. The courses will soon be held in Western Highlands and Northern (Oro) to reach provincial and district public servants.

Australian High Commission Counsellor Education and Leadership, Suzanne Edgecombe, said gender equity and the empowerment of women is a top priority of the partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia.

“Denying opportunities to women is a great inhibitor of economic development, innovation and investment – this is the case in Australia just as it is in Papua New Guinea,” Ms Edgecombe said.

“We are fully committed to supporting the Government of Papua New Guinea’s push to uphold gender equity and social inclusion across all public sector agencies.

We want women and men to stand shoulder-to-shoulder as leaders to create change on gender-based violence and inequality.”

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration

Inspirational, ethical public sector leaders can boost district services

Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore officially launches the District Training Rollout.

The Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) launched the District Training Roll-out in Ialibu-Pangia District, Southern Highlands.

The launch of the District Training Roll-out coincided with the commencement of the PNGIPA Project Management short course for district-level public servants.

More than 30 public servants from District Development Authorities attendeded the course, including participants from the districts of Ialibu-Pangia, Nawaeb (Morobe), Nuku (West Sepik), Sohe (Northern) and Talasea (West New Britain).

The course was supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public-sector leaders.

Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore said the PNGIPA and Precinct programs reach out to public servants across Papua New Guinea to provide them with tools to be more efficient and effective in their work.

“To meet our objectives as a nation we must have a culture of excellence and inspirational leadership in the public sector,” Mr Kapavore said.

“We are focused, as a Government, on providing more opportunities for the personal and professional growth of public servants.”

“We need public-sector leaders who are ethical, capable and inclusive, and this is being achieved by PNGIPA, the Precinct and the partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia.”

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis addresses the crowd who gathered at the Ialibu-Pangia District Headquarters.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said that providing regional public servants with opportunities to develop their technical capabilities and leadership skills was a priority of the PNG-Australia Partnership.

“Public servants take responsibility for the delivery of vital services in every corner of the country,” Mr Davis said.

“These training programs support provincial, district and local government authorities to be better equipped to respond to citizens, promote business, and develop local solutions to local challenges.”

“We want to better enable District leaders to drive service delivery at the local level, and involve citizens and communities in identifying their own economic opportunities and development needs.”

Secretary for Department of Personnel Management, John Kali also said public servants on the ground carry the reputation of the government.

“In my forty years with the public service my simple motto has been: ‘serve the people’”

“There’s no magic about it – we want to give public servants the tools to serve our people in the Districts and Local Level Governments.

“We are giving ethical, values-based leaders the opportunity to rise-up, step up and speak up.”

The course is being co-delivered by Papua New Guinean and Australian trainers, as part of PNGIPA’s Precinct partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission.

In 2017, more than 200 public servants from the provinces and districts took part in Precinct courses.

Categories
Precinct Leadership Program

Public speaking and Speechwriting short course nominations open

Nominations are now open for the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Public Speaking and Speechwriting short courses, which will be held in Port Moresby from 20 – 22 June 2018 and Vanimo 25 – 27 June 2018.

This executive leadership short course is designed to enhance the public speaking and speechwriting skills of public sector leaders (Grades 14 and above), building your capacity to convey critical information and motivate action.

  • Practical sessions will give participants the skills and tools to craft and deliver compelling speeches to motivate and inspire, which include:
  • Planning
  • Writing messages
  • Anticipating responses
  • Rehearsing
  • Refining
  • Speech delivery

Nominations close 30 April 2018. For further information and application forms, please contact the Department of Personnel Management through:

Mr Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager – Executive Leadership Development Division
Phone: 327 6326 or Email: ravugamini_vele@dpm.gov.pg

Ms Junelyn Veratau, Senior Executive Leadership Development Officer
Phone: 327 6407 or Email: junelyn_veratau@dpm.gov.pg

Nominations close 30 April 2018

Categories
Events Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

PNG a leader on climate change says Environment Ambassador

Ambassador Patrick Suckling speaks to the audience about the Paris Agreement and the role of Papua New Guinea as an international and regional leader on climate change.

Australian Ambassador for the Environment Patrick Suckling noted that Papua New Guinea had played an important leadership role on climate change issues, as international negotiations continue on the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

Mr Suckling gave the keynote address at The Paris Agreement and Climate Change Leadership in the Pacific, a discussion event hosted by the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) and the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct on 30 January.

An audience of public sector, academia, non-government organisations and civil society representatives took the opportunity to participate in a lively discussion on the local, regional and international responses to climate challenges.

Mr Suckling said that the effects of climate change are disproportionately affecting vulnerable communities in the Pacific and Papua New Guinea had a strong voice and a vital role to play on global climate change policy.

“With the Paris Agreement, over 190 countries recognised there is a problem and agreed to act, to act urgently and to act together,” he said.

“Leaders in the Pacific speak with great moral authority and this resonates with the international community.

I’ve heard there are communities in Papua New Guinea having to relocate because of rising seas and others that are challenged by severe weather events, such as heavy rainfall and flooding.”

“Regional leaders, including successive Prime Ministers of Papua New Guinea, have advocated for strong action and practical solutions to the challenges of climate change.”

“Australia and Papua New Guinea have worked together over many years to address the threats of climate change, for example climate proofing infrastructure like roads and building community resilience.”

An engaged audience from the public and private sectors, academia, non-governmental organisations, and civil society put questions to Ambassador Suckling.

Papua New Guinea and Australia are signatories to the Paris Agreement, an accord to take action to reduce emissions as a means for preventing the global temperature from rising more than two degrees.

As Ambassador for the Environment, Mr Suckling represents Australia on global environmental issues, including negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Mr Suckling said that there was wide consensus around the world regarding the Paris Agreement and that everyone must play a role, including representatives from the private sector.

“Corporate business is getting on board with this agenda more than ever before,” he said.

“They are increasingly aware of the risk of climate – how to adapt, change and be robust – and they are also focused on the opportunities of a changing global economy based on lower emissions and climate resilience.

A lot of countries and a lot of companies are saying that this is big business. Many countries are demonstrating that you can reduce emissions and grow the economy. On some estimates meeting climate change commitments by just the key emerging economies is a $23 trillion opportunity.”

The Paris Agreement and Climate Change Leadership in the Pacific was hosted by UPNG and the Precinct in order to facilitate discussion on public-policy challenges and opportunities, and on how ethical leaders can support positive change for communities in Papua New Guinea.

UPNG is a core institution of the Precinct, a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to strengthen the public sector and promote leaders who can develop and implement effective public policy.

Categories
Announcements Inclusive Strategic Leadership

Inclusive Strategic Leadership short course nominations open

Nominations are now open for the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Inclusive Strategic Leadership short courses, which will be held in Port Moresby from 25 – 27 April 2018 and Goroka from 30 April – 2 May 2018.

This executive leadership short course is specifically tailored to current public sector middle to executive level managers and leaders (Grade 14 and above) who are motivated to strengthen their strategic thinking and planning skills for inclusive development.

The three-day course offers participants the opportunity to develop their own strategic frameworks and engage leading experts on public sector leadership, sustainable and inclusive development, and strategic planning.

It covers three learning themes, which are:

  • Strategic thinking, planning and leading
  • Government strategy and planning frameworks
  • Gender, inclusion and participatory planning

Nominations close 5 March 2018. For further information and application forms, please contact the Department of Personnel Management through:

Mr Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager – Executive Leadership Development Division
Phone: 327 6326 or Email: ravugamini_vele@dpm.gov.pg

Ms Junelyn Veratau, Senior Executive Leadership Development Officer
Phone: 327 6407 or Email: junelyn_veratau@dpm.gov.pg

Categories
Announcements Events Future Leaders Program News and Information Precinct Leadership Program

Future Leaders Program nominations are open

Applications are now open to Port Moresby based public servants for the Future Leaders Program, which will commence on 9 April 2018 as part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The Future Leaders Program offers leadership training that is tailor-made for the Papua New Guinea public sector.

  • Improve key public service skills, including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development.
  • A combination of skills-based training, peer-to-peer learning, participatory exercises, class discussions, academic course work and applied workplace projects.
  • A fully-funded, nine-month program with 3 x two-week residential learning blocks at the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance in Port Moresby.

For further information and application forms, please contact the Department of Personnel Management (DPM) through:

Mr Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager – Executive Leadership Development Division –
Phone: 327 6326 or Email: ravugamini_vele@dpm.gov.pg

Ms Junelyn Veratau, Senior Executive Leadership Development Officer –
Phone: 327 6407 or Email: junelyn_veratau@dpm.gov.pg

Completed application forms and relevant documentation must be provided to DPM by Close of Business on Friday, 9 February 2017. Late applications will not be accepted.

Selection criteria:

  1. Applicants must be permanent Public Servants occupying positions from Grade 10 – 14 from the Provinces and Grade 15 – 16 at the National level
  2. Have five years of relevant work experience, including mid–level management experience
  3. Recommended and supported by the Agency Heads to attend the program
  4. Have demonstrated leadership skills
  5. Possess a minimum of Grade 10 or Equivalent High School Qualification
  6. Grade 12 or Equivalent High School Qualification
    (desirable)

Required documentation:

  • Completed application forms
  • Copy of Curriculum Vitae (CV) detailing duties and responsibilities, demonstrating 5 years of relevant work experience including mid-level management experience.
  • Certified copies of academic certificates and transcript for all previous high school and university studies
  • A letter of recommendation from the Agency Head

Applications that do not include the required documentation will not be considered.

Categories
Announcements News and Information Precinct Leadership Program Writing for Government

Writing for Government short course nominations open

Nominations are now open for the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Writing for Government short courses, which will be held in Port Moresby from 28 February – 2 March 2018 and Alotau from 5-7 March 2018.

This executive leadership short course provides with public sector leaders (Grades 14 and above) with an opportunity to boost their professional writing skills.

The course provides participants with technical advice on preparing top-standard government documents and written communication, with an emphasis on appropriate language, styles and templates. It is delivered by technical writing experts and experienced former public servants, and covers:

  • The principles of writing for government
  • Briefing notes
  • Policy briefs and NEC submissions
  • Planning and strategy documents
  • Reports
  • Policies

For further information and application forms, please contact the Department of Personnel Management through:

Mr Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager – Executive Leadership Development Division
Phone: 327 6326 or Email: ravugamini_vele@dpm.gov.pg

Ms Junelyn Veratau, Senior Executive Leadership Development Officer
Phone: 327 6407 or Email: junelyn_veratau@dpm.gov.pg

Nominations close 5 February 2018

Categories
Events

Precinct Board focused on development of subnational leaders

Public Service Minister Hon. Elias Kapavore launches the inaugural Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance short course in Madang.

Supporting the development of public servants in districts and provinces including opportunities to engage in the public-private partnership arrangement, were the key discussions of the Executive Advisory Board of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct in Madang last month.

The meeting also coincided with the launch of the new short course on project management.

Public Service Minister Hon. Elias Kapavore said the Precinct is helping to strengthen the foundations of the public service.

“We want to see an improved public sector in the country – today and in the future,” he said.

“We can improve service delivery, with the people we have, if we can commit ourselves fully; if we can become responsive; if we can become accountable. We need decisive, strong, accountable leadership. We can make change and we can make a difference to our country and it must begin now.”

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said the development of public sector leaders is a priority of the partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia.

“The Board meeting and Project Management course held in Madang are important signals of intent for the Precinct to be increasingly focused on subnational areas,” he said.

“It reflects Papua New Guinea and Australia’s shared commitment to ethical leadership, strong governance and inclusion in the public sector.

The Precinct’s eminent Executive Adivsory Board includes John Kali, Jean Kekedo and Dame Meg Taylor.

By empowering leaders in regional areas we will increasingly see local solutions to the regional challenges in delivering key services.”

The Precinct’s eminent Executive Advisory Board comprises Archbishop Douglas Young, John Kali, Father Jan Czuba, Bruce Davis, Dame Meg Taylor, Tony Shepherd, Jean Kekedo, David Guinn and Serena Sasingian.

Board members toured the area around Madang town before the meeting, visiting Bilbil Village, RD Tuna and the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance regional training centre at the Divine Word University.

 The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders throughout PNG.

Categories
Events PNG Institute of Public Administration

Future leaders meet with Ambassador for Women and Girls

Dr Stone is warmly received by staff at the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance.

Australia’s Ambassador for Women and Girls Dr Sharman Stone met with participants of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Future Leaders Program to discuss the qualities needed to overcome challenges and champion positive change in the public service, during her recent visit to Papua New Guinea.

Participants took the opportunity to ask questions of Dr Stone, who worked as a senior public servant in Australia and then spent 20 years as a Member of Parliament before her appointment as Australia’s Ambassador for Women and Girls.

Dr Stone said public servants have to be incorruptible and act with honesty and integrity.

“As a public servant you have to be fearless and expert in your advice to politicians,” she said.

“You’ve got to have respect for the job that you do and for the policies that you implement. Your personal competency is in your hands and your training needs to be life-long.

You’ll be carrying those personal characteristics with you – your honesty, integrity, accountability, competency, gender equity principles – and then you’ll have a public service that will make the country great.”

The Future Leaders Program has been tailor-made to assist Papua New Guinean public servants make the step up to decision-making positions through the development of key skills including leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development. The program is underpinned by Government of Papua New Guinea policies – including the Leadership Capability Framework and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy.

Future Leaders Program participant Wendy Tom Isu, Acting First Assistant Secretary at the Department of Treasury, speaks to Dr Stone about being a champion of gender equity in the Papua New Guinea public service.

Women represented 13 of the 25 participants in the third cohort of the Future Leadership Program.

Dr Stone said the partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia is supporting more women to be brought into leadership positons.

“We want men and women to stand shoulder to shoulder and share leadership – we want women to be seen as leaders and to become leaders,” she said.

“You’ve got to find your champions – there will always be a Minister or a director of your department who is a champion and understands GESI.”

“We know from the research that a company does better when it has an equal number of men and women on its board, in the executive or in management.”

Categories
News and Information PNG Institute of Public Administration

Provincial public servants and Board exchange views on leadership

Jean Kekedo shares some of her experiences as a public servant working in remote areas, with course participants and her fellow Executive Advisory Board members.

Regional public servants and the Board of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct came together in Madang recently to exchange insights and ideas about public sector leadership and delivery of services in subnational areas.

More than 45 participants at the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance’s project management short course took hold of a unique mentoring opportunity with the Precinct’s eminent Executive Advisory Board, which included Archbishop Douglas Young, John Kali, Fr Jan Czuba, Bruce Davis, Dame Meg Taylor, Tony Shepherd, Jean Kekedo and Serena Sasingian.

Course participant Angella Wauwau, community development officer in the Nuku District of West Sepik Province, said public servants were being trained to ensure local communities are empowered to respond to local issues and opportunities.

“We officers at the district and LLG level experience firsthand the challenges, problems, needs and aspirations of our people,” Ms Wauwau said.

“We need to be equipped with knowledge and skills – refresher courses and short courses empower us and motivate us.

“I believe this is the right direction and way forward to assist public servants – we can go back to serve our people and we can deliver government services effectively and efficiently.”

Angella Wauwau tells participants about her work in Nuku District, West Sepik Province.

Project Management was the first Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance short course to be run in Madang with Precinct support, which is increasingly focused on providing opportunities for subnational public servants.

Douglas Kilipi, DDA Executive Officer & Project Manager in the Mul-Baiyer District of Western Highlands Province, said public servants in regional areas each have a crucial role to play in national development.

“It all boils down to us public servants. We do what we can do rightfully, honestly and accountably in our little way to contribute to our district and the country as a whole.”

“We have many challenges, but tackling them comes back to each one of us as public servants to be responsible and ethical in our conduct.”

Course participants came from the provinces of Western Highlands, West Sepik, Oro; the Madang Districts of Middle Ramu, Bogia, Sumkar, Rai Coast, Unsino-Bundi and various branches at the Provincial Headquarters.

Categories
UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

More than 2,000 books presented to School of Business and Public Policy

Staff and students from the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy will now have access to more information from new teaching and learning materials.

More than 2,400 new books and journals were presented to the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct last week.

The books were handed over by Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor Benedict David, to the Executive Dean at the School of Business and Public Policy, Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai.

The new materials cover economics, business, political science, human resources, tourism, management, governance and development.

Categories
Precinct Leadership Program UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Australian Parliamentary Delegation visits Precinct

The Parliamentary Delegation at the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

A Parliamentary Delegation from Australia visited the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct in Port Moresby on Monday 6 November, as part of their official visit to Papua New Guinea.

The delegation, which included Senator the Hon Ian Macdonald,  Ken O’Dowd MP,  Cathy O’Toole MP, Senator Kimberley Kitching and  Julia Agostino, met representatives from the Precinct’s core partner institutions, including the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG), the Department of Personnel Management, the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration and the Australian National University (ANU).

UPNG hosted a roundtable discussion which provided partners with the  opportunity to talk to the delegation about the impact of the Precinct.

Dr Manoj Pandey (left), Australian National University economics lecturer seconded at the University of Papua New Guinea, and Methuselah Wabiria (right), fourth year economics student, explain the impact of the Precinct partnership with UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy.

Methuselah Wabiria, third year economics student at UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy, told the delegation how important the Precinct partnership with ANU has been for his academic development.

“ANU is the number one university in Australia and I consider myself lucky to be taught quantitative economics and critical thinking skills by these lecturers,” Mr Wabiria said.

“I know how much that can influence policy and how much my country can benefit from an economist who understands the statistics.

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration Precinct Leadership Program

Provincial public servants complete inaugural Future Leaders Program

Course participants, from (L-R): Len Gafem, Nigel Tahija, Kaiomen Kens Ningin and Elish Peono.

Twenty-five public servants from 12 provincial administrations and health authorities in the country have completed the first ever Future Leaders Program through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The Future Leaders Program is focused on the development of public servants’ professional skills, leadership capabilities, strategic thinking and policy development.

The first cohort began in March and participants travelled to Port Moresby three times for intensive two-week blocks at the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA).

The Future Leaders Program is delivered as a collaboration between PNGIPA, the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy and the University of Queensland with guidance from the Department of Personnel Management as part of the Papua New Guinea-Australia partnership.

Future Leaders Program Cohort 1 participants discuss gender in the workplace.

Grace Garu, Finance Manager at the Southern Highlands Provincial Health Authority, said the Future Leaders Program motivated her to go beyond the core duties of her role.

“This course is about leadership. I was already a manager but I worked within my confined zones,” she said.

“The Future Leaders Program has broadened my vision – being a leader means to lead others in making effective changes and to be a role model.

You have to assist your staff and show them where to go and this course has made me humble myself and fit in their shoes.”
“I want to help them, mentor them, build them – and that will help the organisation move forward.”

Kaiomen Kens Ningin was promoted to the position of Acting Human Resources Manager at the Western Provincial Administration just as he commenced the Future Leaders Program in March.

Grace Garu (right) and her colleague Elizabeth Brian (left) from the South Highlands Provincial Health Authority.

“Without this course, given the responsibility of Acting HR Manager, maybe I would be sitting there thinking ‘how will I go about it?’” Mr Ningin said.

“I’m a manager, I’m a leader and this program is making me think and take responsibility in that role.

This course has made me become a change agent. I feel confident I have the capacity to make changes for my organisation.”

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

Categories
Uncategorised

PNG-Aus Partnership focused on regional leadership development

Public servants in the provinces are being given opportunities through specific training under the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct to gain skills and knowledge that will drive improved service delivery, economic opportunities and community development at the provincial and district level.

Department of Personnel Management Secretary John Kali welcomes public servants to the launch of the courses.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct launched two courses in Kokopo last month, which were attended by 57 participants.

The courses, Project Management and Public Speaking and Speechwriting, were launched by Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore, Department of Personnel Management Secretary John Kali, Acting Provincial Administrator Wilson Matava and Penny Dennis, First Secretary at the Australian High Commission.

The Precinct is increasingly focused on the development of provincial and district leaders, in line with Government of Papua New Guinea’s decentralisation agenda.

Mr Kali told participants that ethics and values-based leadership was crucial for service delivery in regional areas.

“Throughout the next few days you will be touching on some of these values, such as wisdom, honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility and accountability,” he said.

“Skills and competency for service delivery is not only for Port Moresby – it’s going out to Kokopo, Pomio, Nakanai and all the districts and Local Level Governments in the country.”

Carol Malisa, a budget officer at East New Britain’s Nonga Hospital, at
the Public Speaking and Speechwriting course.

“Accepting the invitation to attend these courses means you are accepting the challenge to come and make a difference – upgrade your skills and upgrade your confidence, so we can respond positively in the way we deliver services,” Mr Kali said.

Mr Matava said it was important to embrace opportunities to improve the public service at the regional and national levels.

“Programs like these improve capacity and our performance in the front line,” he said.

“These reforms support improved service delivery and create economic opportunities.”

Ms Dennis said the launch of the courses supported the Papua New Guinea-Australia partnership for improved decentralisation and service delivery.

“The Australian High Commissioner recently described Papua New Guinea’s provinces and districts as the engine room for the nation’s future growth,”
she said.

“It is fitting that we support you – the participants in your own region – because you are responsible for keeping this engine running.”

Precinct courses respond to demands for skills and knowledge pertinent to existing and emerging public sector leaders. They encourage new ways of thinking about leadership in the PNG context and maintain a focus on
ethics, transparency and equality.

The Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders throughout PNG.

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration Press Releases

Precinct supports PNGIPA to step up regional training

Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore launches the first Precinct event in Kokopo.

The Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) is increasing its regional training programs, with the aim to develop provincial and district leaders.

PNGIPA, a core partner of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, launched its Project Management course in Kokopo, East New Britain Province last week.

The Project Management course was attended by more than 20 participants and marked a significant landmark for PNGIPA.

The Precinct is supporting PNGIPA’s training delivery which includes increased opportunities for vocational education in subnational areas and improvements to regional training centres.

The course was launched by Public Service Minister Elias Kapavore, Department of Personnel Management Secretary Mr John Kali CMG OBE, Provincial Administrator Mr Wilson Matava and Ms Penny Dennis, First Secretary at the Australian High Commission.

Project Management students and facilitators work through a course exercise.

Minister Kapavore told the participants the Precinct partnership was supporting many positive changes at PNGIPA.

“We want to take the institution to the next level as the premier School of Government in the Pacific Region and we are committed to doing this with the support from our partners,” he said.

“We are focused on improving the quality of courses delivered in the country and we will be extending these courses to the New Guinea Islands region, Madang and parts of the Highlands.

“I want to remind you all that this opportunity comes with responsibility. Do what is best for the community and the country.”

Ms Dennis said the Australian Government was pleased to support the Government of Papua New Guinea’s focus on transparent and accountable subnational leadership.

Left to right: Elias Kapavore, Minister for Public Service; Penny Dennis, First Secretary at the Australian High Commission; Angori Wewerang, PNGIPA Director; John Kali, DPM Secretary.

“The Precinct and our institutional partners – like PNGIPA – look forward to continuing to support emerging provincial and district leaders.”

The Precinct supports the decentralisation process through the development of public sector leaders.

It is creating a generation of leaders who can improve service delivery, economic opportunities and community development throughout Papua New Guinea.

The Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders throughout Papua New Guinea.

Categories
PNG Institute of Public Administration

New infrastructure will continue PNGIPA tradition of leadership

Architectural drawing of the new PNGIPA Administrative Wing

The Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) has continued its revitalisation with the construction of new facilities which will support the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders.

A new Administration Wing and Learning Resource Centre, which are being constructed through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, will provide modern spaces for vocational learning, teaching and discussion.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said the buildings will provide facilities befitting the nation’s premiere school of government.

“The new infrastructure will ensure that PNGIPA is able to continue its proud tradition of producing Papua New Guinean leaders,” Mr Davis said.

“The Precinct is a symbol of the modern partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia as economic and strategic allies.

“We are working together to support the development of leaders at all levels of government who can deliver essential services to the people.”

The new Administration Wing is on schedule to be launched in November and will house the ‘Bully Beef Room’, maintaining a connection to Papua New Guinea’s first generation of national leaders.

The room is named in honour of the Bully Beef Club – the group of Papua New Guinean leaders that made a significant contribution to the intellectual discussion that preceded PNG’s Independence.

Bruce Davis, DPM Secretary John Kali and Librarian Malala Moi break ground ahead for the construction of the Learning Resource Centre.

Construction on the new Learning Resource Centre began in June following a demolition and ground-breaking ceremony.

It will replace the original library, which was constructed in 1963 and gifted to the Councils of Papua and New Guinea by the local governments of Australia in 1966.

The Learning Resource Centre will be ICT ready, ensuring PNGIPA has the capacity to deliver contemporary courses in a manner that is modern and accessible.

The use of external shade and aspect have been considered to ensure energy efficiency and the comfort of staff and students.

PNGIPA is also undergoing a process of institutional strengthening, led by its management team and supported by the Precinct.

This includes technical assistance in strategic planning and management, ICT and student management systems, and a review of curricula at the institution.

A Precinct partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission has also improved PNGIPA’s internal capacity to design and deliver courses, resulting in an increase in graduate numbers.

More than 130 public servants have now graduated from PNGIPA with Australia-accredited diplomas, delivered through the Precinct partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission.

Categories
UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Economics students victorious at School of Business debating competition

A engaged audience of UPNG students and staff ready for the debate.

Emerging leaders at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) exchanged perspectives on some of the key issues facing the nation at the 2017 School of Business and Public Policy Debate Competition.

The competition was held form 21-22 September and included teams which represented the divisions of economics, public policy management, strategic management and business management.

The Economics Students Society were crowned champions after they defeated the Public Policy Management Students Society in the closely contested final.

Bobby Kunda, President of the UPNG Economics Students Society, said the Debate Competition encouraged students to consider different perspectives on important topics for Papua New Guinea.

“The competition is a forum for intellectual discussion about ongoing issues in the nation,” Mr Kunda said.

“It promoted networking and teamwork, and next year we want to increase the number of participants.”

Methuselah Eka Wabiria from the champion Economics team.

“The teams brought different perspectives from their fields of study,” he said, “we all have different views and this provides an avenue to understand the other side,”

“Economics students brought different ideas to the public policy management students, and the same was the case with those from strategic management and business management.”

Topics included the development of small-medium enterprises, the privatisation of state-owned enterprises, the attainability of Papua New Guinea’s Vision 2050 and reserved seats for women in parliament.

The 2017 School of Business and Public Policy Debate Competition was organised by the Economics Students Society and supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct partnership between UPNG and the Australian National University.

The Precinct supports dialogue and discussion on Papua New Guinea’s development challenges and how capable, ethical leaders can support positive change.

Categories
UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

UPNG graduate aims to bring development home

A young graduate begins a new chapter in her life after university on the path to achieving her dream of being a policy analyst.   

Growing up in a remote area and experiencing firsthand the difficulties in accessing basic services is what pushed Martha Waim to excel in her studies right through to university.

Martha became the first of her 11 siblings to graduate with a university degree – a coveted Bachelor of Economics from the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) at the 62nd Graduation Ceremony on 28 July 2017.

It was the proudest moment for this young woman from a mixed parentage of Simbu and Eastern Highlands Provinces which she shared with her extended families from both sides.

University graduation ceremonies are perhaps as exciting an event for the families of graduates as they are for students themselves. 

Martha is now a cadet at the National Research Institute, researching Universal Basic Education.

Twenty members of Martha Waim’s family from Simbu and Eastern Highlands certainly weren’t going to miss the occasion.

With the airport closed at Mount Hagen, most of her family made their way to Goroka where they were able to secure tickets to Port Moresby.

A few missed out though and rushed down the Highlands Highway by four-wheel drive to Lae, where they arrived just in time for the last flight of the day to the nation’s capital.

“I’m very excited, my family are happy too – a whole bunch came down for the graduation,” she said

At UPNG, Martha came under the tutelage of Australian National University (ANU) academics who work at the School of Business and Public Policy through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia that is supporting the development of future leaders, including those who can shape the nation’s public policy.

She said the ANU academics’ passion and commitment had a great influence on the students.

“The lecturers put a lot of time and effort in to the program,” Martha said.

“They took a personal interest in us, in what our dreams were and what we wanted to do.

This included writing reference letters to help with internships and scholarships – simple things that went a long way.”

Martha was one of 57 students who benefited from the UPNG-ANU Partnership throughout their degree program.

Martha Waim holds her coveted Bachelor of Economics from the University of Papua New Guinea at the 62nd Graduation Ceremony.

ANU academics teach hundreds of School of Business and Public Policy students each year and assist with curricula design, capacity development and research agendas.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis, in his address at the Graduation Ceremony, said the students could achieve great things by applying their education in a way that benefits Papua New Guinea.

“Congratulations to all those graduating today and all those who have supported you on your journeys – your family, friends, lecturers and tutors,” Mr Davis said.

“You are now the future leaders of Papua New Guinea.

Each and every one of you has an obligation to help shape the country that Papua New Guinea will become during the course of your life.”

Martha is up for the challenge and her path has led her to a graduate position at the Papua New Guinea National Research Institute (PNG NRI), where she is contributing to the evidence base for the nation’s public policy makers.

“PNG NRI has taken me on as a cadet. I’m currently attached to the education program – Universal Basic Education – doing surveys and research. 

The National Research Institute provides graduate opportunities for emerging leaders, including Martha Waim, Daphney Kollin and Jamie Sali.

I’ve increased my knowledge base a lot and I also hope to further my studies.”

David Ayres, PNG NRI Senior Deputy Director, said the cadetship brought outstanding recent graduates to the Institute and provides them a year of training and experience.

“PNG NRI has for a number of years had in place a cadetship program. In the past couple of years we have given that program a much sharper focus and professional edge,” he said.

“Those that excel are then provided with the opportunity to join PNG NRI for a further two years as Research Project Officers.  At present, we have 6 cadets, and 6 Project Officers working at the Institute.

The cadetship is an important contribution by PNG NRI to building the country’s capacity to recognise and deal with its challenging development issues and problems.”

Martha said the undergraduate degree and her cadetship were important steps towards her aim of contributing to Papua New Guinea’s future.

“I’m passionate about seeing development in my country – it’s the reason I took up economics,” she said.

“I come from a remote area in the Highlands where it is very difficult to access services; I lived there and know firsthand how things are.

My dream job is to be a policy analyst, perhaps with Treasury or the Asian Development Bank. I want to see policies that can be implemented effectively for the people.”

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News and Information

Inclusive leaders ready to boost regional service delivery

Public servants from the provinces have strengthened their leadership skills through a Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct course. Thirty-four public servants from 11 provinces representing central agencies and subnational offices were selected to take up the Inclusive Strategic Leadership course, which was held in Port Moresby this week (eds. 21-23 August 2017). More than 50 per cent of the participants were women.

The three-day course offered participants the opportunity to develop their own strategic frameworks, engage experts on public sector leadership, sustainable and inclusive development.

One of the participants was Dr Max Manape, Director Public Health at the Eastern Highlands Provincial Health Authority, who oversees more than 120 staff across eight districts. 

Dr Max Manape is ready to apply his strategic frameworks to improve primary healthcare in Eastern Highlands Province.

Dr Manape said he is keen to share the concepts of inclusive leadership with his team and make use of key government policies – such as the Ethics and Values-Based Leadership and Management Capability Framework and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy – to plan the delivery of primary healthcare.

“This workshop has really opened my eyes to how I can make the connection from National Government plans,” Dr Manape said.

“When I get back I will bring our officers together and conduct a three day workshop to share what we learned – it will inform our planning for next year. 

We have to emphasise inclusion as part of linking the national level to the provincial level and down to the districts.”

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia that supports the development of ethical, capable public sector leaders throughout PNG.

Australian High Commission Counsellor Jodie McAlister said the Precinct was increasingly focused on subnational areas, in line with the Government of Papua New Guinea’s decentralisation agenda.

“Precinct short courses and other programs are being delivered to people from provincial administrations, district offices and local level governments,” Ms McAlister said.

“This is strengthening local leadership and gives public servants throughout Papua New Guinea the opportunity to develop important vocational skills.

“This subnational focus will also see the Precinct support improvements to regional training centres around the country, which will better enable high–quality training to be delivered through local institutions.”

More than 700 people have now participated in Precinct short courses which cover a range of skills required of current and emerging public sector leaders in Papua New Guinea, including ethical decision making, writing for government, public speaking and inclusive strategic leadership.

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UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

ANU academics inspire UPNG students to make a difference

Kelly Samof – UPNG Economics Graduate and 2018 ANU-UPNG Scholarship recipient.

Kelly Samof is quick to admit that when he started university he was thinking only of getting a degree and finding a job to secure his own future.

Now Kelly’s face lights up when given the opportunity to speak about his studies in economics and his hopes for the future of Papua New Guinea. His tall frame moves excitedly to make each point.

“Once I finish studying I want to work at the Central Bank of Papua New Guinea or the Department of Treasury,” Kelly said.

“I want to find an area of economics that I enjoy and can excel in.”

Soon after starting his Bachelor of Economics at UPNG SBPP in 2013, Kelly found himself under the guidance of academics from the ANU through the Precinct.

“The partnership between the two universities has had a big impact on both my education and my personal growth,” he said.

“The academics from Australia showed us that we can use our education to make a difference in Papua New Guinea. They believe in us and this belief has given us confidence in our abilities.”

Through the Precinct, the Australian academics teach a number of economics and public policy subjects including Applied Economics and Business Statistics, Economic Policy, Quantitative Economics, Intermediate Macroeconomics, Decentralisation Policy, and Policy Monitoring and Evaluation.

Seconded ANU academic, Dr Manoj Pandey, celebrates graduation day with Kelly Samof.

“The lecturers tell us that what we learn is on par with students in Australia and Europe, and they talk about the huge potential of our country,” he said.

“This has been inspirational to me. As a Papua New Guinean you don’t grow up thinking that way.”

Kelly they were encouraged to see themselves as global citizens and not just as undergraduates.

His credentials as a global citizen and an emerging leader were boosted when he travelled to Sydney in 2016 after being awarded a Kokoda Track Foundation Archer Leaders Scholarship, which aims to develop tertiary students who have demonstrated an unquestionable commitment to their studies, communities and country.

Kelly once again reaped the benefits of his hard work when he was awarded the ANU-UPNG Scholarship in Economics in April 2017, which is supported through the Precinct partnership.

The scholarship will see Kelly return to Australia in 2018. This time to Canberra where he will live for two years while he undertakes a Master of International and Development Economics at ANU.

In Alotau and Port Moresby, Kelly’s family and friends continue to encourage him on his journey.

“They’re supportive of the fact that I’m growing as a person and learning to interact with people from outside Papua New Guinea,” Kelly said.

“It was a barrier that I had to break through, learning to communicate with people from a different culture.

“All their hopes are with us to bring something better when we go out in to the world.”

Kelly graduates with his School of Business and Public Policy peers at the 62nd UPNG Graduation Ceremony.

He is not the first in his family to excel academically with his father, Dr Lucas Samof, also graduating from UPNG. Dr Samof studied medicine, specialised as an anaesthetist and is presently Director of Critical Care and Medical Services of the Milne Bay Provincial Health Authority.

Kelly’s younger sister may also look to follow in those footsteps when she joins him in Port Moresby to study science at UPNG, with a view to moving into medicine.

Kelly is excited by the prospects of furthering his education and believes the education and experience he gains at the ANU can equip him with the tools to make a difference in Papua New Guinea.

“I don’t expect to change the whole world, but I know I can play a part in shaping the future of Papua New Guinea by helping to create good policy and contributing to sensible economic decisions,” Kelly said.

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Events Gender PNG Institute of Public Administration Press Releases

PNG and Indigenous Australian women make leadership link

Professional women leaders from Papua New Guinea and Australia.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their Papua New Guinean counterparts have taken the first step towards establishing a formal dialogue on leadership, gender and culture at a landmark meeting timed to coincide with Australia’s annual celebration of its Indigenous people.

A panel discussion hosted by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct on Monday brought eminent women from both nations together for NAIDOC Week, which is held each year to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Indigenous Australians.

Stephanie Harvey, CEO of Indigenous Community Volunteers in Australia, said she was excited to share ideas and experiences with women leaders in Papua New Guinea.
“PNG is our closest neighbour and I believe there is a lot we can learn from each other,” Ms Harvey said.

“It would be wonderful if we could build strong relationships between Indigenous women leaders from Papua New Guinea and Australia to strengthen leadership, governance and economic development.”

“In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are in leadership roles and are walking side by side with male leaders.”

The four visitors from Australia were welcomed to PNGIPA by a singsing group

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said the partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia is particularly focused on supporting current and emerging women in leadership positions.

“We want to ensure institutional barriers to women’s participation in the economy are addressed,” Mr Davis said.

“These events spark conversations that need to be had around important topics, such as women in leadership, and create networks that can support positive change.”

“One of the great strengths of the Papua New Guinea-Australia partnership is the person-to-person links that span business, education and sport.”

The panel discussion also included Divine Word University President Dr Cecilia Nembou, Exxon Mobil’s Susil Nelson-Kongoi and Vonda Malone, Mayor of Torres Shire Council in Queensland.

The event was hosted by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia that supports the development of ethical, capable leaders, and facilitates dialogue about development challenges.

WECREATE Challenge participant Rita Jaima Paru (left) (Owner/Director – Dial-a-Lunch Services) at the roundtable discussion, to the rights is Mayor of the Torres Strait Shire Council, Vonda Malone.

The four invited guests had earlier joined staff at the Australian High Commission in a ceremony to raise the Australian flag with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags.
Yesterday, the High Commission also hosted a roundtable discussion with the Indigenous Australian women and invited guests. The discussion is to explore business, innovation and entrepreneurship themes.

A key outcome of this session will be to develop initiatives that could be taken forward into the APEC year.

NAIDOC first emerged in the 1920s when Aboriginal groups sought to increase awareness on the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians.

This year’s NAIDOC Week theme – Our Languages Matter – celebrates the important, unique role Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land, history, spirituality and rites.

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Events PNG Institute of Public Administration Press Releases

Precinct partnership continues revitalisation support at PNGIPA

A ground breaking ceremony for the Learning Resource Centre was held with Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis, DPM Secretary John Kali and Librarian Malala Moi, who has worked at PNGIPA for 42 years.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct continues to support the revitalisation of the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) with the construction of a new Learning Resource Centre.

A ground-breaking ceremony was held on 21 June to celebrate the centre, which will provide modern spaces to Papua New Guinea for teaching, research and discussion.

The new resource centre will also complement the ongoing construction of a new administration office called the new Bully Beef Building at PNGIPA, which started last year.

The institution’s capacity to deliver courses is being strengthened through the Precinct, supported by a partnership with the Australian Public Service Commission.

More than 300 Papua New Guineans have graduated from PNGIPA in 2017, including 42 public servants who were awarded Australian-accredited diplomas through the Precinct partnership.

DPM Secretary Kali symbolically demolished a model of the old PNGIPA Library that is to be replaced.

The institution also hosts the Precinct’s Future Leaders Program, which was launched in March 2017 and provides executive leadership training for emerging public sector leaders.

The Future Leaders Program is a collaboration between PNGIPA, the University of Papua New Guinea and the University of Queensland, with guidance from the Department of Personnel Management.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said the Precinct is an example of the modern partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia that is based on shared economic and strategic objectives.

“Our two governments are supporting the development of leaders at all levels of government that can deliver essential services to the people,” Mr Davis said.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis and DPM Secretary John Kali were welcomed to PNGIPA by a singsing group from Tari, Hela Province.

“This Precinct partnership is focused on the development of Papua New Guinea’s next generation of public sector leaders; equipping them with the skills, values, networks, and experience to take forward the development of Papua New Guinea.”

The new Learning Resource Centre will replace the deteriorating library, which was constructed in 1963 and gifted to the Councils of Papua and New Guinea by the local Government of Australia in 1966.

PNGIPA has played an important role in the history of leadership development in Papua New Guinea and the new Learning Resource Centre will support this tradition to be continued.

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Gender Press Releases

West New Britain mainstreams gender equity

Cathleen Dringo, a Community Development Officer at Kimbe Urban LLG, presented at the workshop.

West New Britain has prioritised merit based employment and equal access to opportunities as part of the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy rollout in the province.

The GESI Policy has been piloted at provincial level in West New Britain and it has now been taken to district level in Talasea.

The Department of Personal Management recently hosted a GESI Policy workshop in Talasea to demonstrate how the GESI Policy can meet provincial and district priorities and how it can be mainstreamed into public sector work at district level.

Provincial Administrator William Hosea said he was grateful that West New Britain was entrusted to pilot the rollout.

“The province has captured GESI activities in its corporate plan and we are looking forward to the implementation of the policy,” Mr Hosea said.

“We talked about effective service delivery. The way we think and the way we do things must be a coordinated effort, working together as a team and valuing the contributions of women.

“It’s very important for Talasea District to carry out GESI activities in a transparent way.”

Public servants from Talasea District and LLGs worked together at the GESI Policy Workshop.

Talasea District Administrator Robert Dau thanked the Department of Personnel Management and the Australian Government for their support of the policy rollout in the district.

“Talasea is a very big district in the province and gender equity is very important,” Mr Dau said.

“The onus is on us, the community development officers and our public servants to start the implementation of the GESI Policy.”

“I am very happy that officers from the District are attending this workshop because the policy requires everyone to work together,” Mr Dau added.

The GESI Policy has been given prominence in West New Britain since it was first introduced 18 months ago and has been integrated it as part of business processes and service delivery.

The workshop was facilitated by the Department of Personnel Management and the West New Britain Provincial Administration, and supported by the Australian Government.

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Initiative Program Precinct Leadership Program Press Releases

Public servants make their voices heard

Ms Rhoda Karl tested out some of her new skills learned at the training program.

A group of Papua New Guinea’s public servants have boosted their leadership skills, ensuring they have the tools to communicate effectively with peers and the public.

More than 40 public servants from throughout Papua New Guinea participated in the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Public Speaking and Speech Writing course, held in Port Moresby.

The intensive course was tailored to the Papua New Guinean public sector, and focused on creating the right tone to motivate and inspire others.

Assistant Secretary Rhoda Karl, from the Department of Treasury, said her role involved the preparation of departmental and ministerial speeches.

“I have gained confidence in preparing speeches, and for public speaking and presenting myself,” Ms Karl said.

Mr Xavier Bate Winnia, from the Constitutional and Law Reform Commission, wrote a speech for presentation on the final day.

“This session has given me a framework and polished some of the skills that I use every day.”

Xavier Bate Winnia, Senior Research Officer at the Constitutional and Law Reform Commission, said he now has a greater understanding of how to make an impact with his ideas.

“In my line of work, as a researcher, we are used to providing a lot of information – but it can be too much to take in,” Mr Winnia said.

“Through this training I have learned how to carefully craft my message in a way that is specific to the audience.”

The Public Speaking and Speech Writing course was led by Toby Ralph, one of Australia’s eminent communications experts and speech writers.

He said public speaking and speech writing are important skills that can be trained and improved.

“To communicate ideas crisply and carry people with you matters when you’re at the pointy end of the public service,” Mr Ralph said.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support ethical and capable public sector leadership.

Precinct courses respond to demand for skills and knowledge that are pertinent to existing and emerging public sector leaders.

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Videos

VIDEO: The Precinct – Supporting change in Papua New Guinea’s public sector

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Videos

VIDEO: The Precinct – Supporting ethical and values-based leadership

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News and Information

Communiqué – 2017 Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference

Communiqué
2017 Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference

22 to 25 May 2017
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

1. The 2017 Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference (PPSCC) was held in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from Monday 22 May to Thursday, 25 May 2017. A total of 24 participants from 14 Pacific Nations, the Pacific Islands Centre of Public Administration and Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat attended. The list of countries represented and their representatives is at Attachment A.

2. The theme for the conference was “Ethical and Values-based Leadership and Governance in the Pacific

3. Funding for the conference was provided by the Government of Australia through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, and the Government of Papua New Guinea.

4. Commissioners expressed their deep gratitude to the Honourable Peter O’Neill, Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea, staff of the PNG Department of Personnel Management, other public servants and people of PNG for the organisation and hosting of the conference, as well as the warm hospitality extended to them during their stay in PNG.

CONFERENCE RESOLUTIONS

1. Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct

The Conference expressed their appreciation for the tour of University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) and Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA). The Conference also expressed their appreciation for the opportunity to meet with the leaders of these organisations as well as the Precinct Advisory Board and engineers.

Several members of the Conference identified that they wanted to be part of the Precinct or to send their staff or students for training through the Precinct.

2. Jurisdictional reports

Each Pacific Island nation provided their jurisdictional report. This report covered the challenges and opportunities in the public sector in their respective countries. All members appreciated the updates and agreed to share with other members.

3. Ethical and values based leadership

PNG through Secretary Kali outlined the development of the PNG Ethics and Values Based Capability Framework. This was well received by all members.

The Conference agreed that the six (6) Values in the Framework are shared across the Pacific and can go across the public and private sectors. The Conference identified that there is a conflict between some of the Customary values, Christian values and Organisational values. As public servants, it was agreed that the public interest should be put first.

4. Future of the PPSCC

The Conference agreed on the importance of the ongoing continuation of the conference. Commissioners fulfil a dual role in providing strategic advice to political leaders in the region, as well as responding to implementing decisions of these political leaders.

It was agreed that the rationale for the Conference can be strengthened through a strong, evidence based business case, which would be important in seeking donor funding. One method for this could be a mapping exercise on capability and capacity across the Pacific region which will provide a benchmark.

The governance structure and arrangements for future conferences was agreed by the Conference with the amendment of adding linkages to domestic and regional bodies, as well as clarifying the scope of a Governing Board.

The Conference agreed to strengthen relationships with key leadership fora such as the Pacific Islands Forum and Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

It was further agreed that the paper on the future of the Conference be populated with indicative costs to support discussions for each jurisdiction with their Government.

For future conferences, the Conference agreed to the following themes:

  • Theme 2018: Open and Transparent Government and Leadership (e.g. ICT, Social media policies, citizen-centric policy development, citizen/public perception of the public service)
  • Theme 2019: Leaders adding public value (including inclusiveness, success stories, gender, domestic and workplace violence, disability, migrants, seasonal workers, workplace bullying and harassment).

5. Membership of the PPSCC

The Conference agreed to welcome New Caledonia and French Polynesia as members of the PPSCC. It was also agreed that membership of the Conference should mirror the membership of the Pacific Islands Forum. Timor Leste will remain as an observer to the Conference.

6. Acknowledgement

The Conference acknowledged the contributions made by PICPA over the years in organising and coordinating previous conferences.

The Conference also acknowledged the high level support and contributions from Dame Meg Taylor, Secretary-General of the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat.

7. Way forward

The Conference agreed for the Working Group to revise the paper as soon as possible on the future of the conference, taking into account the comments made throughout the conference. The Conference will provide prompt support to the Working Group.

Once finalised, the paper will be distributed to all PPSCC members to support discussions with their Governments.

The Conference has accepted New Caledonia’s offer to host the 2018 Conference in Noumea around May/June 2018 and New Caledonia will join the Working Group. The other members of the Working Group are PNG, Palau, Samoa, and Australia with support from the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

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Press Releases

PNG showcases ethics and values to Pacific Public Service Commissioners

Secretary John Kali welcomed his counterparts from across the Pacific.

Papua New Guinea has put ethical leadership and governance at the top of the agenda as it hosts 2017 Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference in Port Moresby this week.

Department of Personnel Management Secretary, John Kali, said PNG was working through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct to strengthen public service leadership at all levels.

The Precinct is founded on two key policies – the Government’s Ethics and Values-Based Leadership and Management Capability Framework; and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion policy.

Mr Kali said he was looking forward to sharing PNG’s experience in reshaping its public sector with his Pacific counterparts.

“Our Government’s policies promote the values that leaders in the workforce must have,” Mr Kali said.

“These values allow them to be creative and productive in the workplace, but more importantly to be ethical, committed and passionate about their work.

“The Precinct is the mechanism to develop the capacity of the public service – to make it more efficient, effective and ethical.”

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to strengthen the leadership capabilities of the nation’s public servants.

Australian High Commissioner to Papua New Guinea, Bruce Davis, said it was fitting for the Precinct to support the 2017 Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference.

“Ethical leadership and strong governance in the public sector are fundamental for businesses to flourish, and for the delivery of essential services such as healthcare and education,” Mr Davis said.

“The Pacific Public Service Commissioners’ Conference is aligned with this focus.

“We are part of this region and are committed to supporting strong governance and ethical leadership – which ensures peace, stability and prosperity.”

The annual conference of Pacific public service leaders provides a forum to share information and experiences, and to identify, develop, cooperate and mutually promote public service excellence in the region.

The 2017 PPSCC coincides with the second meeting of the Precinct’s Executive Advisory Board, which will enable discussions about the potential for collaboration between nations in the development of public sector leaders.

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Events Gender Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

UPNG takes the lead on gender equality

UPNG School of Business and Public Policy academic staff with UPNG Vice-Chancellor, Professor Albert Mellam, and Executive Dean, Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai (back-centre).

The University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy will integrate gender equality into its curriculum, as part of a new approach to changing behaviours.

A gender workshop was held at the university recently for the school of business staff to ensure gender issues become a part of student learning. The workshop was funded by the Association of Commonwealth Universities and facilitated through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

University Vice-Chancellor, Professor Albert Mellam, said that the institution had an important role to play in creating change.

“Gender equality is so fundamentally critical to Papua New Guinea. This is one way of contributing to pushing back against these problems that are endemic across the world,” Professor Mellam said.

The School of Business Executive Dean, Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai, said that the time is right to embrace gender equality and embed it as part of the curriculum.

“Sustainable future growth must be based on the right principles, practices, and policies.

“We can integrate gender in to the way business, economics and public policy are taught, and change the way students think about these issues,” Professor Pillai said

Wasita Pomel, a Business Management tutor, and Nathan John, an Economics tutor, were among the participants at the Gender Equality Workshop.

Head of Business Management Evelyn Kua said education is crucial for improving opportunities for women in Papua New Guinea.

“Gender equality has been a foreign concept in the Papua New Guinean cultural context and that is a challenge which needs to be addressed.

“Traditionally, men have been the decision makers and the providers of food, shelter, and protection – but these trends are changing.

“We need to create a curriculum that can bridge the gap between tradition and the realities of today,” Mrs Kua said.

The University’s School of Business will use the outcomes of the workshop to promote gender equality as part of its curriculum, as part of the Papua New Guinea Government’s Gender and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy, and the Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is part of the Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership to build a new generation of ethical and accountable public and private sector leaders. The Precinct also works to ensure the Government’s GESI Policy is rolled out among all its stakeholders, including the University of Papua New Guinea.

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Events Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Partnership focused on empowering women and ending gender-based violence

UPNG Second Vice Chancellor’s Lecture of 2017 (from left to right) Lady Winifred Kamit, Founding Chairperson Coalition for Change, Ms Evan Biesco, case manager with Femili PNG, Ms Rosie Batty, Australian of the Year 2015 and Ms Monica Toiseneglia, HR Manager Steamships Transport.

The Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership continues its focus on improving gender equality and ending family sexual violence in the country.

A recent visit by anti-violence campaigner and 2015 Australian of the year, Rosie Batty, was an opportunity to showcase some of the achievements of the partnership.

In the law and justice sector, Australia in partnership with the Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee (FSVAC) is working to improve coordination and quality of services provided to survivors of violence.

Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor, Rod Hilton said a recent workshop brought together provincial police, state lawyers and other stakeholders, to identify challenges and opportunities to improve services such as legal aid, medical attention and psychosocial services for survivors of violence.

“An effective response to ending family and sexual violence is about better access to justice, improved support services and ultimately, prevention,” Mr Hilton said.

Secretary for the Department of Justice and Attorney General and Chair of the National FSVAC, Dr Lawrence Kalinoe, described the workshop as an investment that would make a real impact on the lives of people.

Australian High Commission Minister Counsellor Rod Hilton (Front left), Department of Justice and Attorney General Secretary and Chair of the National FSVAC Dr Lawrence Kalinoe and participants of the referral pathways workshop.

“We have to make sure that whatever is written in the law actually gets translated into physical, tangible systems on the ground, and that they function properly,” Dr Kalinoe said.

Ms Batty who was the guest speaker at the workshop, commended participants for their passion and commitment to bringing about change.
Ms Batty also participated in the University of Papua New Guinea Vice-Chancellor’s Lecture supported through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct. Ms Batty said family violence needed to be part of the conversations at schools, in the workplace and at homes all over the world.

“Family violence exists in every pocket of every community across Australia. In Australia and Papua New Guinea, victims of family violence are overwhelmingly women. To work together on solutions is the only way to go.”

Ms Batty was in the country as part of her tour in support of Femili PNG, a local family and sexual violence case management centre based in Lae.
The Papua New Guinea – Australia Partnership works across a number of sectors including education, health, law and justice gender and sport.

For further information, including access to related materials, please contact the Australian High Commission media team: +675 7090 0100

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Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

Scholarship awardee committed to PNG’s development

Dr Albert Prabhakar Gudapati, Head of UPNG SBPP Economics Division; Mr Kelly Samof, 2018 Economics Scholarship awardee; and Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai, UPNG SBPP Executive Dean

An Economics student at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) has been awarded a scholarship to continue his studies in Australia.

Kelly Samof, from Milne Bay, has been awarded the 2018 Economics Scholarship to study at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra.

“I’m feeling really excited and privileged to go to Canberra next year and rejoin some of the ANU staff who taught me at UPNG,” Mr Samof said.

“It will be a great experience and I believe the master’s program will equip me with skills to meaningfully contribute to Papua New Guinea’s development. One day I’d like to work at the Bank of PNG or the Department of Treasury, where I can help to shape the nation through economic policy.”

Kelly recently completed a Bachelor of Economics at UPNG, where he will work as a tutor in the School of Business and Public Policy before commencing the Master of International Development and Economics Program at ANU.

UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy Executive Dean, Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai, said the scholarship selection was based on grades, the results of an entrance exam, and interviews with candidates.

“The staff at UPNG and ANU were very impressed with Kelly’s academic performance and by his qualities as a person,” Professor Pillai said.

“The experience of joining the School of Business and Public Policy team as a tutor will help him to continue to develop as a leader.”

Ani Rova, who is currently studying at ANU under the economics scholarship program, said it had been a great opportunity, both in terms of education and personal development.

“There are a lot of challenges and I want to encourage Kelly to be well-prepared for the program as well as the cold weather,” Mr Rova said.

“He will need to become very skilled in the quantitative aspects of the course, such as mathematical economics and econometrics.”

Each year, ANU academics teach economics and public policy to hundreds of UPNG School of Business and Public Policy students.

The institutions are part of the Pacific leadership and Governance Precinct – an initiative of the Papua New Guinea and Australian Governments to strengthen public sector leadership.

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Future Leaders Program Precinct Leadership Program Press Releases

Emerging leaders determined to create opportunities for women

Future Leaders Program participants, Sylvia Gemung and Elisha Peono.

Emerging public sector leaders participating in the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Future Leaders program believe they can advance employment opportunities for women throughout the country.

The Future Leaders program is supporting public servants to improve their technical and leadership skills, and to become champions of key policies in the Government of Papua New Guinea, such as the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) policy.

Elisha Peono, a GESI officer with the East New Britain Provincial Health Authority, said the Future Leaders Program is helping to develop strong and ethical leaders that can create more opportunities for marginalised groups in Papua New Guinea.

“The Future Leaders Program is a good combination of the theoretical and practical aspects, and taking part will help me realise my potential,” Mr Peono said.

“When we go out in to the workforce we can be leaders in policy creation and decision making. Gender Equity and Social Inclusion is about improving accessibility to employment and participation in the workforce, particularly to improve the number of women in decision making positions.”

The Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to develop capable and ethical public sector leaders who will be able to lead and manage the delivery of fair and impartial government services for all citizens of Papua New Guinea.

The Department of Personnel Management is currently reviewing applications for the second cohort of the Future Leaders program, which is scheduled to begin in May of this year.

Sylvia Gemung, a women’s officer with the Morobe Provincial Administration, said the Future Leaders Program will help her take the step up.

“The Papua New Guinea and Australian Governments are looking at empowering women and getting them active in the upper levels of the public sector,” Ms Gemung said.

“I’m challenged and inspired, and I believe in my heart that after completing this training there will be room for me to get up there.

“This program will help me greatly in implementing government policies at a provincial level.”

The Future Leaders Program has been created specifically for the Papua New Guinea public sector and is based on Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy. Applicants are awarded places on merit through a competitive assessment process.

It is delivered in collaboration with the University of Papua New Guinea, the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration and the University of Queensland, under the guidance of the Department of Personnel Management and the Department of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology.

Participants undertake a combination of skills-based training, peer-to-peer learning, participatory exercises, class discussions, academic course work, and workplace projects.

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Events Press Releases

APEC to put Papua New Guinea in the global spotlight

Left to right: Senior APEC Analyst Carlos Kuriyama, APEC Secretariat Executive Director Alan Bollard, Pacific Economic Cooperation Council Secretary General Eduardo Pedrosa and the PNG Government Ambassador to APEC Ivan Pomelau.

Leading Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) experts say Papua New Guinea stands to benefit from being in the global spotlight when it hosts the APEC forum in 2018, including an anticipated boost to investment, tourism and trade.

A forum was held last week to raise awareness of the opportunities that APEC would present in 2018, following the APEC Policy Development Dialogue between Papua New Guinea, Australia and senior APEC officials from across the region.

The forum was hosted by the Australian High Commission and the Papua New Guinea APEC Secretariat through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct. The Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to develop future leaders and drive public policy debate.

Australia is supporting Papua New Guinea in its policy preparations for APEC, including the provision of training for officials to develop, advocate and implement policies, and the establishment of the APEC Study Centre at the National Research Institute.

Dr Alan Bollard, Executive Director of the APEC Secretariat based in Singapore, said hosting APEC was a big task and Papua New Guinea was advancing in its preparations for the event.

Attendants, including National Research Institute Director Dr Charles Yala, had the opportunity to put questions to the APEC experts.

“APEC is trying to integrate the Asia-Pacific region economically by cutting trade barriers and keeping the spirit of trade, investments, people movement and economic integration alive.

“By hosting APEC Papua New Guinea will get a lot of exposure internationally from people that didn’t know much about the country.

“People will better understand the sorts of trade, tourism and investment opportunities that exist here,” Dr Bollard said.

Rod Hilton, Minister Counsellor at the Australian High Commission, said hosting APEC is a privilege and an exciting prospect for the country.

“APEC offers the unrivalled opportunity of bringing the attention of world leaders to Papua New Guinea,” Mr Hilton said.

“PNG will be able to showcase its culture, people, beauty, economy and opportunities to the world.

“Australia is happy to partner with Papua New Guinea to support its hosting of APEC, including providing both security and policy support.”

Precinct partners were amongst the attendants at the event, including Vele Ravugamini, Executive Manager at the Department of Personnel Management, and Ponnusamy Manohar, Deputy Dean at the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy.

Papua New Guinea Government Ambassador to APEC, Ivan Pomaleu, said a lot of work had gone in to preparing for the APEC Policy Dialogue.

“This has been a very useful exchange and we are a taking the commentary and critical analysis of the APEC Secretariat on board,” Mr Pomaleu said.

“A large group of officials representing various government agencies right throughout our public service will be upskilled through the Australian partnership program in preparation for 2018.”

Pacific Economic Cooperation Council Secretary General Eduardo Pedrosa and Senior APEC Analyst Carlos Kuriyama also attended the forum.

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PNG Institute of Public Administration Precinct Leadership Program

Next generation of public sector leaders ready to step up

Twenty-five of Papua New Guinea’s most talented public servants are currently participating in the new Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – Future Leaders Program, which is designed to strengthen public sector leadership and service delivery.

The inaugural participants have just completed their first two-week residential sessions looking at ethical decision making, emotional intelligence, risk management, strategic thinking, public policy in Papua New Guinea and transformational leadership.

The Future Leaders Program is being delivered through a collaboration between the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) and the University of Papua New Guinea School of Business and Public Policy (UPNG SBPP); both core Precinct partners.

The 10-month Program is providing public servants with skills-based training, group learning and academic course work tailored for the Papua New Guinea public sector.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia.

The Department of Personnel Management is currently taking applications for the second cohort of the Future Leaders Program, which will begin in May 2017.

At the recent launch of the Future Leaders Program, Department of Personnel Management Deputy Secretary, Taies Sansan said that the participants had been identified as future public sector decision-makers.

“Our country needs leaders in the public service that are strong, capable and ethical,” Ms Sansan said.

“You have been chosen because you have demonstrated the qualities that it takes to be a leader.

We believe you have the potential to step up and make a difference, and the Future Leaders Program will give you the tools to fulfil this promise.”

All of the participants in the first cohort of the Future Leaders Program were drawn from Provincial Governments and there was also balanced representation of women and men.

Australian High Commission Counsellor for Economic Governance, Jodie McAlister said the Future Leaders Program would help participants respond more directly to the needs of Papua New Guineans.

“As more responsibility is extended to the provincial and district level there needs to be capable leaders ready to make a difference,” Ms McAlister said.

“The Precinct is providing training programs tailored to public servants in Papua New Guinea.

With the solid foundations laid down during this program, you can be confident in your ability to create policy, make decisions and respond to the needs of the people.”

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PNG Institute of Public Administration Videos

Video: PNGIPA Graduation

321 Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) students graduated on Friday 10 March 2017

Forty-two of the graduates were public servants awarded with Australian-accredited diplomas, supported through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Women represented 54 per cent of graduates in the Precinct-supported courses – the Diploma of Government (Management), and Diploma Training Design and Development.

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Australian National University Press Releases

PNG’s election history preserved online

The electoral history of Papua New Guinea since the 1970s has been made available online for use by the public and researchers.

The Papua New Guinea Electoral Results Database, launched today (eds. 16 March), is a comprehensive source of information on the nation’s elections.

It maps the country’s 111 provincial and open constituencies and provides information on voting patterns over the last four decades.

Working closely with the Papua New Guinea Electoral Commission, the Australian National University Development Policy Centre has produced the database, which presents election information in a way that is easy to understand. The database is now available and free for all to use through the Development Policy Centre website.

The creation of the database has been supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to develop capable and ethical leaders.

Australian High Commissioner to PNG, Bruce Davis, said the PNG Electoral Results Database would inform the development of high-quality policy and reform.

“Strong and effective policy always has its foundations in a good evidence-base,” Mr Davis said.

“A good understanding of voting patterns and trends can help the Electoral Commission manage elections in Papua New Guinea.”

“Australia’s support for the election database continues a longstanding partnership between the Papua New Guinea and Australian Electoral Commissions.”

The PNG Electoral Results Database is available online at: http://devpolicy.org/pngelections/

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Master of Economic and Public Policy Press Releases UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

New Master’s program will continue UPNG tradition of leadership

A new master’s program at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) will enable future leaders develop and implement high-quality public policy that will shape the nation.

The Master of Economic and Public Policy was launched today (eds. 16 March) and is a result of the collaboration between the University of Papua New Guinea School of Business and Public Policy and the Australian National University, supported by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The Precinct is a partnership between the Papua New Guinea and Australian Governments, which provides education and professional development to support capable and ethical public sector leadership.

Australian High Commissioner to Papua New Guinea, Bruce Davis said training leaders with expertise in the disciplines of economic and public policy was crucial to any nation’s future prosperity.

“The policy decisions made by governments drive economic and social development and the delivery of services to the people,” Mr Davis said.

“The University of Papua New Guinea was the country’s first university and one that has continued to play an important role in shaping the leaders of the nation.

“The Master of Economic and Public Policy will continue this tradition of producing high-quality graduates; technically skilled and capable leaders who can apply these qualities in a way that is relevant to PNG.”

The School of Business and Public Policy is in the process of finalising a new five-year strategy that will ensure there is a strong academic and research program in place.

The new strategy will cement the School’s place as one of the emerging schools of business and public policy in the Asia-Pacific region.

A new School of Business and Public Policy building is also currently being constructed under the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct partnership.

The building will provide students and staff with a modern space for learning, discussion and research.

The University of Papua New Guinea is a leading provider of Accounting, Business, Economics, Public Policy Management programs at the undergraduate level and Business Administration, Human Resources Management, Strategic Management, and Economic and Public Policy at the Master’s level.

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Initiative Program Precinct Leadership Program Press Releases

Transparent extractives sector can be a platform for development

Papua New Guinea has taken another step on the path to adopting global best practice in open and accountable management of its extractive resources.

A three-day workshop hosted by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct and the Papua New Guinea Secretariat of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (PNGEITI) was held in Port Moresby last week to strengthen the way in which revenue from the industry is managed through improved transparency and ethical leadership in the sector.

The workshop involved key resources sector stakeholders from government, industry and civil society.

Papua New Guinea applied to join the EITI three years ago, recognising the benefits to citizens and investors of having improved transparency around the management of the nation’s natural wealth.

The workshop follows PNGEITI’s 2014 report, which identified opportunities for improvements to the sector’s reporting and management.

Deputy Secretary for Treasury, Manu Momo, said the Government had made significant progress towards becoming EITI accredited.

“Despite our challenges, we have achieved a lot in implementing the global EITI standards,” he said.

“The EITI initiative has the potential to deliver significant benefits through increased accountability and transparency.

This means having information available to stimulate more debate on public policy and how to best manage our resource revenue.”

PNGEITI Secretariat Head Lucas Alkan said: “This is a very exciting collaboration between the Precinct and the PNGEITI, which have joined together to improve governance and transparency in the extractive sector.”

“With strong leadership, this industry can be a platform for social and economic change.”

The acceptance of Papua New Guinea as an EITI compliant country, if achieved, will contribute to building a better business environment based on transparency and increased accountability.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to develop capable and ethical leaders who will drive economic growth and improve service delivery.

Australian High Commission Counsellor for Economic Governance, Jodie McAlister, said ensuring appropriate benifits from the resources industry was a challenge shared by Australia.

“The extractives sector is a vital part of the economies of both Papua New Guinea and Australia,” she said.

“The challenge that has been presented to our two countries is to ensure that the revenues from these non-renewable resources are used to build for future generations.

While these resources are finite, with strong governance and leadership the extractives sector can provide the basis for sustainable development, economic growth and diversification.”

PNGEITI is a Government-led initiative, which is supported by companies, civil society groups, investors and international organizations.

It provides a platform for these groups to review, assess, and report on what is being paid by companies and received by governments from extractive industry operations.

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News and Information Press Releases

Australia congratulates school of government graduates

The Australian High Commission congratulates the 321 Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) students who graduated on Friday 10 March 2017.

Forty-two of the graduates are public servants who have been awarded Australian-accredited diplomas, supported through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Women represented 54 per cent of graduates in the Precinct-supported courses – the Diploma of Government (Management), and Diploma Training Design and Development.

The Precinct is a joint initiative of the PNG and Australian Governments to develop ethical and capable public sector leaders.

Australian High Commission Counsellor, Jodie McAlister, said graduates should feel proud of their achievements.

“This graduation ceremony is a celebration of the hard work of the students and staff at PNGIPA.

“The graduates have shown great dedication, which will serve them well as they apply their learning in the workplace,” Ms McAlister said

Australian Public Service Commissioner John Lloyd who attended the graduation said: “You don’t need to be a high ranking official to lead.

“Leadership is demonstrated in your decisions, your behaviours and your actions, regardless of your seniority.

“Leadership is a vital element of a high-performing public service.”

Department of Provincial and Local Government Affairs officer Julia Auka was one of the public servants who completed the Diploma of Government (Management).

She said the training has given her practical skills and renewed confidence in her own abilities.

“The Diploma changed the way I communicate at work.

“It made me come out of my comfort zone and speak up. When I talk to my colleagues now, I am focused on looking at solutions,” Ms Auka said.

The graduation ceremony was the 19th at PNGIPA, the nation’s premiere school of government.

The Precinct supports capacity-building and planning activities for PNGIPA, and the delivery of diploma courses accredited by the Australian Skills Quality Authority. The Precinct is also supporting the construction of new infrastructure at the institution, including a new administration wing and library.

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Events UPNG School of Business and Public Policy

UPNG business school set to enter new era

The University of Papua New Guinea’s leading business school has launched a new Master’s program to ensure more graduates have the skills and leadership capabilities to contribute to Papua New Guinea’s economic growth.

The Master of Economics and Public Policy will commence in 2017 and is targeted at qualified economics and public policy professionals in government, private sector and Non-Government Organisations.

This new degree was made possible through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a flagship investment of the Papua New Guinea and Australia partnership.

The new Master’s program coincides with the development of the University of Papua New Guinea School of Business and Public Policy’s five-year strategic plan to set the direction for the school to 2021.

The five-year strategy will see the school makes the most of new learning infrastructure being delivered under its partnership with the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The entire team at the School of Business and Public Policy recently participated in a two-day planning exercise to inform the new strategy, which includes the new Master’s program and a renewed focus on research.

Executive Dean Professor Lekshmi N. Pillai said strategy was part of a larger vision to cement the School of Business and Public Policy as one of the emerging schools of business and public policy in the Asia-Pacific region.

“We are the leading business and public policy school in Papua New Guinea and we want to continue to improve the quality of learning and research that occurs here.

“In 2019, we will move into a new building with improved learning and teaching facilities and several academic programs to match,” Prof Pillai said.

The School of Business and Public Policy is one of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s key institutional partners, offering undergraduate and post-graduate courses tailored to the needs of public and private sector employers.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to train capable and ethical public sector leaders.

The University of Papua New Guinea is a leading provider of Accounting, Business, Economics, Public Policy Management programmes at the undergraduate level and Business Administration, Human Resources Management, Strategic Management, and Economic and Public Policy at the Master’s level.

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Executive Advisory Board Press Releases

Aus-PNG leaders come together at inaugural Precinct board meeting

More than 1200 Papua New Guineans from both the public service and the private sector are making a difference in their work places this year thanks to important training provided through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

This was among the highlights of the inaugural sitting of the Precinct’s Executive Advisory Board in Port Moresby today (December 1).

The Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to support efforts to develop ethical leaders and to build the capacity of the Papua New Guinea public and private sector.

Department of Personnel Management Secretary John Kali and Secretary of the Department of Higher Education, Research Science and Technology Professor David Kavanamur and Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis were among those attending the Executive Advisory Board Meeting.

Secretary Kali said the Precinct supported Papua New Guinea’s strong public sector reform agenda.

“The public service is undergoing a process of modernisation that will ensure it is equipped to meet the challenges that Papua New Guinea faces as it looks to the future.”

“The Precinct is underpinned by the Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework and the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion Policy,” Mr Kali said.

“These are key policies that will drive us towards PNG Vision 2050.”

Training offered through the Precinct is tailored to suit the needs of existing and emerging leaders in the workforce. It includes Australian-certified diploma level training through the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration; economics at UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy; and short courses on topics such as extractive industries, leadership and innovation in agriculture, and Women on Boards.

High Commissioner Davis said: “The Precinct demonstrates the modern partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia.”

“This joint initiative will continue to develop capable and ethical public sector leaders, who are aware of their important role in the development of PNG and the region”.

“A strong public service is vital for sustained economic growth and improved service delivery.”

The meeting was chaired by Father Jan Czuba. Other members of the board are private sector representative David Guinn, eminent Australian businessman Tony Shepherd, Catholic Archbishop Douglas Young and Dame Meg Taylor, Secretariat of the Pacific Island Forum Secretariat.

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Events

PNG’s unique culture can drive development

Papua New Guineans have been urged to take inspiration from the country’s diverse culture and rich natural environment to create sustainable businesses and contribute to the nation’s development.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct hosted a panel discussion in Lae recently on the potential for innovative indigenous businesses, and the opportunities they offer entrepreneurial women.

The panel, comprising Sir Nagora Bogan, Amanda Donigi, Maria Linibi and Bonita Solomon, was joined by more than 40 local business people and community leaders.

“We need to stop thinking about culture as our history and start thinking about it as our future,” Stella Magazine founder Amanda Donigi said.

“Development cannot happen without culture and Papua New Guinea must develop on its own terms.”

The discussion was opened by Australian Deputy High Commissioner Bronte Moules and was also attended by Ms Sheila Harou, Acting Provincial Administrator for Morobe, and Lady Nohorahnie Bogan.

Ms Moules said the indigenous business sector offered real economic opportunities, particularly for women.

“As an Australian living in Papua New Guinea, I’m constantly struck by the diversity of this magnificent country,” Ms Moules said.

“There are so many people around the world that want to experience the stories, sounds, dances, arts and crafts that Papua New Guinea has to offer.

“These cultural elements provide opportunities for women, at all levels, to participate in the economy.”

Sir Nagora, Chancellor of the University of Technology and President of the Papua New Guinea Indigenous Business Council, said both women and men need to step up and take responsibility for development.

“We are now in transition as a generation of leaders retire and pass on their duties,” Sir Nagora said.

“We need people who can bring strong ethical values, a strong sense of governance, prudential management of our resources and stewardship of our environment.”

Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to support the development of capable and ethical leaders in the public and private sectors.

One of the key objectives of the Precinct is to encourage dialogue and discussion on Papua New Guinea’s development challenges and how ethical leaders can support positive change.

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Precinct Leadership Program

Ethical Decision Making in Leadership short course

36 Papua New Guinean public servants have completed an intensive ethics short course delivered through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The three-day course provided the participants with frameworks for ethical decision making in leadership.

20 women and 16 men travelled from across Papua New Guinea to attend, including participants from East Sepik, Eastern Highlands, Madang, Milne Bay, New Ireland, Port Moresby and Oro.

The course, a key component of the Precinct Leadership Program, is closely aligned with the Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework and the Gender and Social Inclusion Policy, key policies of the Government of Papua New Guinea.

The University of Queensland and The Ethics Centre facilitated the course as part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, a joint initiative between the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to forge a new generation of ethical and capable public sector leaders.

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News and Information

Future public sector leaders meet Australian MPs

A parliamentary delegation from Australia has visited the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) to learn more about the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The event was a unique opportunity to for the staff and students promote the activities of the Precinct, an important bilateral initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia, to stakeholders outside PNG.

The visitors included Members of the House of Representatives from Australia, Ms Ann Sudmalis MP, Mr Damien Drum MP and Ms Madeleine King MP, and delegates from Save the Children, Australia’s largest aid and development agency dedicated to helping children.

After being welcomed by representatives from PNGIPA and the University Of Papua New Guinea School Of Business and Public Policy and the Australian High Commission, delegates joined students and staff in a Diploma of Government classroom, a course which is being delivered through the Precinct to develop and encourage emerging leaders in country.

This proved to be the highlight of the event, as the delegates and Diploma participants were engrossed in discussion on the importance of ethics and leadership to an effective public service and the unique challenges faced in PNG.

Member for Gilmore, Ms Ann Sudmalis, praised Precinct partners for the ethics and governance training being delivered to public servants in PNG.

“The training is something that probably should be happening all over the world and something that is missing in leadership,” Ms Sudmalis said.

“You establishing the course, and probably one of the first, is extra specials and to have a 50-50 gender split, my goodness, you deserve gold medals for that.”

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News and Information

Precinct supports public service leadership

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is supporting Papua New Guinean public servants to apply key national public service policies in ethical conduct and gender equity.

More than 80 public servants, private sector and civil society from mainly provincial and district levels of government attended the Precinct’s Diversity in Leadership for Basic Service Delivery course from 22-25 August.

Department of Personnel Management Deputy Secretary Taies Sansan urged course participants to lead inclusively and cater for all citizens when delivering basic services.

“As leaders we need to work together to ensure the needs of all our people are considered. Your purpose here is to learn about what it takes to be a leader, how to implement the policies in your work areas and how to handle service delivery” Ms Sansan said.

The short course examined the practical application of the two policies that underpin the Government of Papua New Guinea’s public service reform agenda; the Gender Equity and Social Inclusion (GESI) Policy, and the Ethics and Value-Based Executive Leadership & Management Capability Framework.

Australian High Commission Counsellor, Jodie McAlister, reiterated the strong partnership between the two governments to support ethical leadership and governance across the Papua New Guinean public service. Ms McAlister said leadership was about leading by example, and urged participants to make a stand against marginalisation of women and the disabled.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of Papua New Guinea and Australia to promote ethical leadership within the public sector at the national, provincial and district levels.

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News and Information

Precinct graduates keen to drive workplace change

Eighteen Papua New Guinea senior public servants have gained Certificates in Governance and Public Policy from the University of Queensland through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis congratulated the public servants and encouraged them to apply their skills to improving governance, policy development and ethical behaviour.

“It is very good to know that your course was tailored around the government of Papua New Guinea’s Ethics and Values-Based Executive Leadership and Management Capability Framework,” he said at their graduation ceremony.

The public servants were exposed to leading thinkers in the public, private and community sectors, and attended leadership forums with senior Queensland public servants and judicial system representatives.

The students expressed a determination to implement their executive leadership plans and transform their workplaces.

“We came back with so much knowledge from this course and each one of us has objectives that we will implement when we go back to our offices and we will be discussing with our supervisors to make sure we are not restricted in implementing these objectives,” Theresa Siaguru said.

She added: “Governance is the process of making correct decisions. And when making decisions we have to take into considerations certain characteristics such as ethics, protocols, inclusiveness, transparency and effectiveness.”

The Governance and Public Policy course was delivered by the University of Queensland. Students undertook six weeks intensive coursework in Brisbane and four weeks in PNG. The course included group work, mentoring sessions and individual assessment.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the PNG and Australian Governments to strengthen ethical and accountable leadership across the region.

Precinct courses bring together talented and motivated individuals, giving them the practical and ethical framework to advance in key national agencies.

The Precinct also offers degree and diploma courses through its partner institutions, the School of Business and Public Policy at the University of Papua New Guinea, and the PNG Institute of Public Administration.

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News and Information

New electrical transformer to support development at PNGIPA

The Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration (PNGIPA) will now have a stable power supply after a new power transformer and switchboard were installed at the campus.

The upgrade is part of infrastructure renewal work being undertaken through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct initiative.

The new 500kVA transformer unit replaced an old 300kVA transformer installed in the mid-1960s.

PNGIPA’s role as a core Precinct training institution had placed strain on the smaller unit, raising the probability of unplanned outages and future failure.

PNGIPA Project Coordinator Anthony Tuainembe said “to cater for these new developments on the campus, the first thing to do is to upgrade the power systems to cater for the additional buildings and electricity loads”.

PNGIPA is receiving a new administration block and library under the Precinct partnership between the Governments of Australia and Papua New Guinea.

PNGIPA Librarian Eric Nandoma said the works at the campus would enable it to fulfil its role as a core Precinct delivery partner.

“The new library will be a modern and state of the art library, and maintaining constant power supply is of paramount importance to this facility,” Mr Namdona said.

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News and Information

Agriculture course targets leadership and innovation

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is supporting efforts to transform Papua New Guinea’s agricultural sector into a market-focused industry that will drive economic development.

Department of Agriculture and Livestock Secretary Dr Vele Ila’ava launched the three-day Precinct course, Leadership and Innovation in Agriculture, on 19 July saying there was huge potential to increase the efficiency of agricultural production.

“We must transform the agriculture sector in our country by providing accessibility for our people to established markets, recognised systems and increase the opportunities for them to convert it to wealth,” he said.

Dr Ila’ava said the sector remained the most heavily relied upon for rural development, benefiting more than 80 per cent of the population.

Course participants included mid to senior level officials from government departments, provincial administrations, research institutes, universities, industry boards and other organisations engaged in the agricultural sector.

Australian High Commissioner Bruce Davis said there were many opportunities for closer cooperation in agriculture between Australia and Papua New Guinea.

“Agriculture is extraordinarily important and its opportunities are long term,” he said.

“Australia is keen to work with Papua New Guinea through the Australian Centre for International and Agricultural Research, creating farming innovations, conducting joint activities with the private sector and providing agricultural education scholarships for Papua New Guineans,” High Commissioner Davis said.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is an Australia-Papua New Guinea education and training initiative to strengthen leadership, management, and core public service skills in Papua New Guinea.

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News and Information

Public servants urged to performed duties efficiently, effectively and ethically

Public servants have been urged to set aside the wantok system at work and support a new culture of integrity that will strengthen governance and economic development.

Department of Personnel Management Secretary John Kali issued the challenge to forty emerging public service leaders nominated by government departments, agencies and provincial administrations to undergo studies with the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The six month Diploma of Government is delivered by the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration with support from the Canberra Institute of Technology.

Secretary Kali said participants had been identified as future leaders capable of contributing positively to the development of the nation.

“We need to change the working environment so we provide a service that is ethical and also empower our women colleagues,” Mr Kali said.

“When we have good and value based leaders from the top level down … they’ll know and perform their duties ethically over a period of time which will then become their culture and conduct, said Secretary Kali.

Josephine Kama, a Monitoring and Evaluations Officer with the Western Highlands Provincial Administration was among the course participants.

“Western Highlands Province is a male dominated society and it’s very challenging as a woman performing a leadership role,” she said.

“Attending this course will empower me, and I’ll get more knowledge and go back to my province and contribute positively to its development and address these challenges.”

The Australian Public Service Commission’s Jason Preece encouraged the public servants to make the absolute most of the opportunity.

“After you leave the PNG Public Service, you will reflect on your time as a public servant who successfully led, made a difference and did the best for the family, for the people of this country, and helped to build this great nation.”

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of PNG and Australia to promote ethical leadership within the public service  at the national, provincial and district level.

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News and Information

Precinct supports Women on Boards

More PNG women will have the skills and confidence to serve on boards of management after new training being rolled out by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Digicel Foundation CEO Beatrice Mahuru (left) and PNG Women Doctors Association President Lydia Sirigoi (right) are among those undertaking the course, delivered by the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

It focuses on directors’ responsibilities, risk assessment and decision-making frameworks for directors on public and private boards.

Participants included senior and emerging leaders from the public and private sectors.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a partnership between Papua New Guinea and Australia to develop a new generation of ethical leaders who can implement Government of PNG priorities for improved service delivery for the people.

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News and Information Videos

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct explainer video

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News and Information Videos

Graduate Certificate in Governance and Public Policy video

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News and Information

Precinct encourages entrepreneurs

Removing barriers to the establishment of new businesses and creating a greater entrepreneurial mindset will be important factors in meeting PNG’s 2030 target of 500,000 small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), according to an expert panel.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct recently hosted a discussion on the role of leadership and good governance in growing indigenous businesses in PNG.

The panel comprised Australian businessman and indigenous advocate Warren Mundine, PNG Indigenous Business Council Chairman Sir Nagora Bogan, and Gideon Karali, a representative from successful landowner business, Trans Wonderland Limited.

The audience included a select group of senior officials of leading government departments, agencies and the private sector.

SMEs are particularly important in developing countries such as PNG because of the role they play in poverty reduction.

“I believe that everything rises and falls with leadership,” Sir Bogan said. “As I look across the spectrum of PNG, I think we need to put a lot more effort into ethical leadership.

Mr Mundine said Australia and PNG could learn from each other on several topics, including how to create an entrepreneurial mindset among communities who have traditionally had limited involvement with business.

“Twenty-five years ago when I was a young bloke, you used to sit there and say, ‘business and commercial activity is a white man’s game’,” he said. “Well, (in Australia) we had to change that mindset.”

The Precinct is a partnership between the Governments of PNG and Australia to produce a new generation of capable and effective leaders.

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The role of leadership and good governance in growing indigenous business in PNG

Removing barriers to the establishment of new businesses and creating a greater entrepreneurial mindset were two of the key topics explored at a recent panel discussion focused on growing indigenous business in PNG.

The event, hosted by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct at the PNG Institute of Public Administration, brought together indigenous business leaders from Australia and PNG to reflect on what small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in each nation can learn from each other.

The panel comprised Mr Warren Mundine, a businessman, political strategist and indigenous advocate in Australia, Sir Nagora Bogan, Chair of the PNG Indigenous Business Council, and Mr Gideon Karali, a representative from a successful PNG landowner business Trans Wonderland Limited.

The audience included a select group of senior officials of leading government departments, agencies and the private sector.

SMEs are particularly important in developing countries such as PNG because of the role they play in poverty reduction. The PNG Government has set a target of having 500,000 SMEs operating in the country by 2030.

Sir Bogan said the event provided an essential forum for discussion as PNG looks to promote huge growth in the number of SMEs in a relatively short space of time.

“It gave rise to a lot of important, exciting sharing of ideas and also intellectual discussion about this particular issue,” Sir Bogan said.

“How can we translate that into doing what we can to help our people to make the transition from being subsistence farmers to living in the villages to actually becoming entrepreneurs? That’s the biggest challenge. We have the capability to do it, but we haven’t really mobilised to get that right.”

Mr Mundine said Australia and PNG could learn from each other on several topics, including how to create an entrepreneurial mindset among communities who have traditionally had limited involvement with business.

“Twenty-five years ago when I was a young bloke, you used to sit there and say ‘business and commercial activity is a white man’s game’. Well, (in Australia) we had to change that mindset, because if we were going to lift ourselves out of poverty, if we were going to take the leadership that we needed in our communities, then it was a mind shift (to say) that ‘we can do this’.”

Mr Larry Andagali Managing Director from Trans Wonderland Limited said it was valuable to hear how indigenous communities in Australia have been working to create new business opportunities in response to the slowdown in the resources industry – something that aspiring PNG entrepreneurs should also look to address.

“When those resources are depleted we are really left with nothing, so I’d like to use that as an opportunity to reinvest other royalties and equities that we get and put them back into agriculture and more sustainable business,” Mr Andagali said. “That’s a big challenge and it was quite interesting to understand how indigenous businesses conduct themselves in Australia and what we can do in PNG.”

Mr Mundine spoke of how indigenous companies had grown off the back of the resources boom in Australia and how the Australian Government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy (3 percent of government contracts going to Aboriginal businesses by 2020) has given further support to this growth, increasing contracts by 1500 per cent in the last six months.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the Governments of PNG and Australia to promote ethical leadership and strong governance within the public sector at the national, provincial and district level.

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ANU-UPNG partnership update: commencement of 3-year training program and other highlights

Dr Manoj Pandey, visiting lecturer in Economics at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG) under the ANU-UPNG partnership, has completed the first two sessions of a program of weekly training that will run for the next five semesters to improve qualitative and quantitative skills and report writing for a core group of 17 UPNG faculty staff.

The introductory sessions provided a background on how best to present data, and covered both classic and more modern visual representations of data. Subsequent workshops will include training in basic statistical methods, with the training culminating in 2018 with staff members working on their own research papers. Read more

 

 

 

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Bright futures for Precinct graduates

Thirty-one new economics graduates from the University of Papua New Guinea have embarked on career paths that could influence the nation’s future.

The recent graduation of UPNG’s economics class of 2015 represents a milestone for the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – a joint initiative of the PNG and Australian Governments.

Australian National University (ANU) academic Michael Cornish taught the group in their final year under the UPNG – ANU Precinct partnership.

He said many had already managed to secure jobs with big name employers, including PwC, BSP, Oil Search and PNG’s Department of Foreign Affairs.

“It’s a wonderful feeling of pride to be able to see them graduate,” Mr Cornish said.

“Hopefully what they have learned here will set them on a good pathway to a point where some of them will be future leaders of this country.”

Newly graduated economist Hera Hoi is among those to have already secured work, winning a coveted role with BSP.

She said it was a great opportunity to apply her skills and she hoped in the future to contribute to PNG’s development by contributing to public policy development.

“In the future I’d like to do some research work and hopefully get into some policy stuff,” Ms Hoi said.

The Precinct partnership has reinvigorated the teaching of economics at UPNG, with the establishment of a new School of Business and Public Policy (SBPP).

The number of ANU staff at the SBPP has since risen to four, expanding the school’s capacity to deliver high quality courses in economics and public policy.

The SBPP will also receive a new faculty building under the Precinct partnership containing international standard teaching, research and study areas.

The school’s Dean, Professor Lekshmi Pillai, said the relationship with ANU was key to the school’s strategy to promote academic excellence.

“Given the human resources constraints we have, the access to ANU faculty will be critical,” he said.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct aims to forge a new generation of PNG leaders giving them the ethical, intellectual and practical framework to usher in a new era of development.

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Leading with Strategic Intelligence in PNG

Understanding the difference between managing and leading staff is crucial to effective leadership, a lesson that PNG public servants took from  a recent short course held at the the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

The short course, Leading with Strategic Intelligence – Shared Values and Leading Coalitions in PNG, was attended by 16 public servants from national and provincial governments and was delivered by the Australian Centre for Public Management.

The three-day course included a coaching session envisaged to help participants as leaders to self-reflect and develop an awareness of their leadership style and the impact on team dynamics.

“This course has helped me resharpen my tools to lead my organisation,” said Annemarie Kona, Acting First Assistant Secretary at the Department of Education.

“It has challenged me to know myself as a person, and to have a greater awareness of myself before I approach others. I think that’s important if I’m going to be a positive influence on the staff that I work with.”

Grace Yap and Linus Kuravi, both managers from Nonga Hospital in East New Britain, said the course provided a rare opportunity for provincial staff to receive high quality training.

“We’ve learnt a lot, especially about management and leadership skills. When we go back to our province we are planning to disseminate some of the information that we have learnt here to our colleagues who are in managerial positions, and also to the provincial administration.”

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Ethical Leadership Improving Service Delivery

“I am a leader who should focus more on ethics in my public sector field and contribute meaningfully to service delivery. We need to make sure the public service machinery is free of corruption. A patient walking out of my hospital is this measure of success,” said Sister Theonila Watt who is the Director of Nursing Services at  Nonga Hospital in the East New Britain province.

Sister Watt is one of 22 participants from across 5 provinces, 9 government agencies and for the first time – the health sector, who attended the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct short course from 21-23 March on Ethical Decision Making in Leadership.

The three day course by Australia’s The Ethics Centre highlighted the important relationship between ethical leadership at all levels of government and delivering services to the people.

The training included simulations, hypotheticals and practical tools to implement the PNG Government’s 2013 National Public Service Ethics and Values-Based Leadership and Management Capability Framework. The framework centers on key values such as respect, integrity, honesty, accountability, wisdom and responsibility.

Key components of the course were leader’s decision making skills, conflicts of interest, role of leaders in modelling ethical behaviour and how to influence organisational change.

Sister Watt believes the course has been an opportunity to collaborate across sectors, “In order to be in an ethical system, we need to learn from each other.”

The PNG-Australian Government’s Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct works towards strengthening senior executive leadership and supporting improvements to transparency and accountability in service delivery.

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Boosting skills and confidence – Graduate Certificate Public Policy

February 22, 2016

A group of PNG public servants studying for a Graduate Certificate in Governance and Public Policy say the course is helping them improve policy and governance in their departments, and has boosted their skills and confidence.

The participating 18 mid to senior level public servants have been drawn from a range of national agencies and government departments. This semester they will focus on the legal aspects of policy and how they relate to governance.

The course, offered as part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct’s Executive Leadership Program, is delivered by the University of Queensland and involves study in PNG and Australia.

The study supports emerging leaders in the PNG public service, equips them with skills to negotiate challenging policy issues and provides a network to support each other as they progress.

 

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PNG’s premier Executive Leadership Program

The PNG-Australian Government’s Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct has signed a three year agreement with the University of Queensland to deliver the country’s premier training for senior public servants – the Executive Leadership Program.

The program will develop a cadre of ethical and accountable public officials with the capability to lead and deliver equitable government services to Papua New Guineans.

 

The Executive Leadership Program will:

·         Provide an avenue to embed the PNG Ethics and Values-Based Leadership Framework in the PNG Public Sector

·         Bring together institutions and high performing senior public servants

·         Build powerful incentives among potential future PNG leaders, including leaders of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville

 

ELP will comprise of two strands:

1.       Precinct Future Leaders Program: a series of activities for a selected cadre of high performing individuals

2.       Precinct Initiative Program: training across four thematic areas including; diversity and gender in leadership, corporate skills for the public sector, private sector and economic development, decentralization and subnational governance.

 

The Executive Leadership Program will commence July 2016.

To find out further information contact info@pacificprecinct.org

 

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Future leaders graduate – PNGIPA

With the support of the Australian Government, a total of 328 public servants graduated with certificate and diploma qualifications last week from the PNG Institute of Public Administration’s  Waigani, Kokopo and Madang campuses.

Minister for the Public Service Sir Puka Temu urged the graduates to go out and serve their country, as the nation’s founders did 40 years ago.

“I want amongst you to be the next Sir Michael Somare, leading the nation,” he said. “The nation demands your skills.”

The PNG IPA is part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – a landmark partnership between PNG and Australia to develop the next generation of Pacific leaders.

A total of 96 graduates completed qualifications provided by the Australian organisation CIT Solutions, and with the support of the Australian Public Service Commission.

Department of National Planning and Monitoring Aid Coordinator, Yvonne Vavine, completed studies in governance and management.

“This achievement can really help me carry out my duties effectively, particularly working with other departments and agencies. It is a huge bonus to my career having an Australian qualification [through CIT Solutions],”she said. 

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“Information is power” for law and justice sector

“Information is power”, explained Laura Wawun-Kiri, Practice Manager from the Office of the State Solicitor. “Knowing how you manage and use it ethically is important not just in leadership roles but across all levels. Some people use it for corrupt purposes; you can use it for better decision making, helping others, stopping corruption and encouraging accountability,” she said.

Laura is one of the 36 participants who attended the four day short course on “Information studies for law and justice” facilitated by the University of Queensland for the PNG-Australian Government’s Pacific Leadership and Governance Program. The course covers a range of topics including; principles of information within the Ethical Leadership and Management Framework, using information in investigation, traditional and modern approaches to using the media, legal considerations when reporting unethical activities.

Laura explained the different sensitivities of information she deals with on a day to day basis at the Office of the State Solicitor. “Where I work we have to design security measures to protect the information that we hold. The course has introduced other ideas and concepts such as approaches to deal with staff breaches and the interviewing technique called the PEACE model.” 

Networking with other agencies across the law and justice sector has proven beneficial to participants of the short course, as well as the exposure to meet and hear from former Ombudsman Commissioners Ila Geno and John Toguata. “The training has been more than just theory, we have heard inspiring examples from real people such as Ila Geno and the ethical decisions he had to make in his career. Seeing how both Ila Geno and John Toguata back each other shows us that people who think alike and are inspired by the same things can support each other. We can’t do this alone.”

Laura Wawun-Kuvi from the Office of the State Solicitor with Francesca Tamate from the Public Prosecutor's Office.
Laura Wawun-Kuvi from the Office of the State Solicitor with Francesca Tamate from the Public Prosecutor’s Office.

 

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Precinct leaders visit world-class training institutes

The Papua New Guinea Government is bringing the skills and experiences of world-class training institutes to PNG through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Key Precinct stakeholders visited the Joondalup Learning Precinct last week, a West Australian institutional partnership comprising the Western Australian Police Academy; the West Coast Institute of Training, and the top-ranked Edith Cowan University.

The Precinct delegation, led by Department of Personnel Management Secretary John Kali, included PNG Institute of Public Administration Director Angori Wewerang and UPNG’s Executive Dean Professor Lekshmi Pillai.

Secretary Kali said the initiative would promote the growth of the new Pacific Leadership and Government Precinct by providing its institutions the opportunity to learn from the Joondalup Learning Precinct.

Secretary Kali said, “PNG’s new Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct has a vision to help usher in a new generation of ethical and effective Papua New Guinean leaders.

“The Precinct will in time become a centre of excellence in the Pacific for leadership development. This will rely on our partners learning from international success stories. The approaches taken in Joondalup have helped us develop new ideas to improve our own program. We therefore hope to continue our contact with JLP into the future,” he said.

Australian Minister Counsellor Rod Hilton said generating linkages with Australian learning precincts would support future collaborative work.

Mr Hilton said, “The Australian Government’s aid program strongly supports Papua New Guinea’s vision for the Precinct. The exchange with the Joondalup Learning Precinct will assist PNG’s Precinct in establishing quality mentoring and scenario-training programs,” she said.

Its partner institutions, UPNG and the PNG Institute of Public Administration, will hone the talents of public and private sector executives to usher in a new era of development.

The PNG Precinct partners have learnt about JLP approaches to institutional governance, their role in educating the WA public sector, best practice approaches to quality assurance in a tertiary setting, optimum corporate management systems in the tertiary education sector and methodologies for realising effective institutional collaboration.

Key meetings included those with JLP Board members, its senior management and senior officials of the West Australian public service commission – including the Commissioner, Mr Mal Wauchope.

PNG Precinct partners and their counterparts from Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade will be working on a Record of Understanding for the two institutions as an outcome from the visit. The RoU will outline the expected areas of ongoing cooperation between the two institutions as the Precinct vision is realised over time.

Precinct partners visit the new award-winning Ngoolark Student Services Building at the Edith Cowan University in Western Australia.
Precinct partners visit the new award-winning Ngoolark Student Services Building at the Edith Cowan University in Western Australia.

Secretary John Kali with Brett Dorney, General Manager Industry - Skills Training at the West Coast Institute, along with Precinct partners.
Secretary John Kali with Brett Dorney, General Manager Industry – Skills Training at the West Coast Institute, along with Precinct partners.

Police Officer Inspector Louise Ball from the West Australian Police Academy discussing the Joondalup Learning Precinct mentoring program.
Police Officer Inspector Louise Ball from the West Australian Police Academy discussing the Joondalup Learning Precinct mentoring program.

Australian High Commission First Secretary Nick Murphy with PNG Institute of Public Administration Director Angori Wewerang.
Australian High Commission First Secretary Nick Murphy with PNG Institute of Public Administration Director Angori Wewerang.

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Precinct Building Extractive Leadership

The new Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is supporting one of Papua New Guinea’s most important economic sectors by strengthening the leadership capabilities of government officials tasked with managing the nation’s resources-dependent economy.

With a focus on supporting current and future generations of Papua New Guinean leaders, the Precinct brought together a mix of technocrats along with key industry players in Port Moresby this week to consider public policy challenges and opportunities in the extractives sector.

Participants, including senior officials from government departments and state owned enterprises, discussed the challenges and opportunities for improved  governance in the PNG extractives sector, the impact of low commodity prices, revenue transparency, ways to enhance PNG’s economic stewardship and ways to better develop and implement Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative – the EITI.

The Precinct, which was officially launched on 6 November by PNG’s Public Service Minister Sir Puka Temu, Higher Education Minister Tabar and Australia’s Foreign Minister Bishop, is a joint PNG-Australian initiative to promote ethical and technically-competent leadership.

PNG’s extractives industry requires skilled regulators more than ever.  Sharply lower commodities prices have contributed to a 12 per cent reduction in the PNG’s 2016 budget forecast. At the same time potential new mining and gas developments would, if realized, offer new revenue sources for the country.

Supported by the PNG and Australian Governments in partnership with ExxonMobil PNG, the University of Queensland-delivered workshop focused on how pragmatic policy-making and implementation can overcome existing capacity constraints.  Speakers offered perspective on PNG’s position in the global and regional economies, and drew on lessons both from PNG’s history as well as case studies from Africa, Asia and Australia.

Acting Australian High Commissioner in PNG Bronte Moules said Papua New Guinea and Australia ‘enjoy an abundance of mineral and petroleum resources, and these are the powerhouses of our economies – we are clearly natural partners to collaborate on and to deliver a leadership in extractive industries event’.

ExxonMobil PNG’s Managing Director Andrew Barry commended the joint PNG and Australian governments’ focus on building the next generation of PNG leadership.   He further commented that the opportunity for PNG to earn value through LNG over the long term is strong, and that “industry, government and community came together on the PNG LNG Project in a truly remarkable way.”

In December 2014 the Commonwealth of Australia signed a Memorandum of Understanding with ExxonMobil PNG focused on building development partnerships. The Precinct collaboration follows on from other partnerships in law and justice with ExxonMobil and the Hela provincial government.

At the Precinct’s official launch last week, PNG’s Minister for the Public Service Sir Puka Temu said new courses would build a new generation of public service leaders.

“They will promote national development and standards of competence and strengthen the culture of integrity in the PNG public service,” he said. “The Precinct will facilitate the establishment of professional networks and partnerships to develop and grow public sector leaders, men and women alike.”

Australian Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop told the launch that enhancing public sector leadership would allow PNG to cement the benefits of recent economic gains.

“The challenge facing this generation of PNG leaders, and the next, is to take even bigger strides and build the very robust institutions that support successful and prosperous nations,” she said.

ExxonMobil PNG's Managing Director Andrew Barry
ExxonMobil PNG’s Managing Director Andrew Barry

Department of Treasury Secretary Dairi Vele
Department of Treasury Secretary Dairi Vele

Course participants from the Autonomous Bougainville Government
Course participants from the Autonomous Bougainville Government

 

Course participants from the Internal Revenue Commission
Course participants from the Internal Revenue Commission

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Temu, Bishop, Tabar share Precinct vision

The new Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct will help district officials deliver better services to everyday Papua New Guineans, Public Services Minister Sir Puka Temu says.

Sir Puka told the Precinct’s official launch that the new partnership with Australia would play important role in the O’Neill Government’s decentralisation strategy by ensuring District Development Authorities could properly manage a surge in public funding.

“The current crop of public servants who are now taking charge of the new District Development Authorities and the large volumes of funding (now available) were not trained to manage that level of resources,” Sir Puka said. “And therefore we need to catchup quickly.”

Sir Puka officially launched the Precinct with Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, and cabinet colleague Malakai Tabar, the Minister for Higher Education, Science, Research and Technology, last Friday (November 6, 2015).

Minister Bishop said that as a friend and development partner, Australia wanted to help PNG make the most of recent economic gains.

“Given the dramatic economic changes that have taken place in recent years, Australia is deeply committed – as is the government of PNG – to ensuring that the nation is able to embrace economic growth and sustain it for the future,” she said.

“A key element of that is ensuring that there is competent and efficient government at all levels. And in a robust democracy like PNG, it is essential that there be a competent, ethical, skilled public service.”

Minister Tabar said the Precinct launch marked the beginning of a new era in which public officials would be better able to make decisions for the benefit of all Papua New Guineans.

“To ensure Papua New Guinea continues its path to prosperity, we need to ensure our country has the high-performing, ethical and technically-proficient leaders, that can capitalise on our abundant wealth in mineral and petroleum resources, and map the course for future generations,” he said.

Sir Puka paid tribute to the PNG Institute of Public Administration – a key Precinct partner – and its Australian-funded technical advisers, for moving quickly to implement a new training program for District Development Authority chief executives.

“This is the level that we must move very, very fast on, because our people are demanding transparency and accountability,” he said. “Our bottom line is this enormous volume of resources must go and improve the education standard of our children, the health standard of our people… And therefore, skilling them, developing competencies, and building what I call this critical mass of middle managers in the country, is so, so important for us.”

Sir Puka said strengthening the nation’s institutions by improving the leadership capabilities of officials was crucial to ensuring future prosperity.

“I believe that with the new leadership that we will create, we will pick up the baton and deliver the vision that our citizens have, and that is an improved quality of life,” Sir Puka said.

The Precinct launch was attended by more than 150 senior figures from government, the private sector and civil society.

Ms Bishop said the Precinct’s contribution to nation-building would help transform PNG and its relationship with Australia.

“Of course, we want to ensure that over time PNG is so able to manage its resources and sustain this economic growth, that our partnership will again change in its nature so that we can focus on trade and investment between our two countries, rather than the aid-donor, aid-recipient relationship that it has been in the past,” she said.

The Precinct partnership between the Government of Papua New Guinea and Australia aims to strengthen ethical leadership capabilities in PNG and across the region through degree and diploma courses in public policy, management and economics.

An executive leadership program is also providing mid-career public servants and private sector managers with the skills they need to step up into senior leadership roles.

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Precinct partnership officially launched

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct was formally launched on November 6, 2015, through a special ceremony marking its important role in building the region’s leaders of the future.

The Precinct launch was attended in Port Moresby by Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop, PNG’s Minister for Foreign Affairs and Immigration Rimbink Pato, PNG’s Minister for the Public Service Sir Puka Temu, and PNG’s Minister for Higher Education Malakai Tabar.

More than 150 senior figures attended the event, representing government, the private sector and civil society.

Guests were given a preview of major new infrastructure works which will transform the Precinct’s partner institutions – the University of Papua New Guinea and the PNG Institute of Public Administration.

“Make no mistake: this is nation-building work,” Minister Bishop said.

“This is the sort of reform that will help build the vibrant, successful, inclusive and fair nation of Papua New Guinea, and it is every bit as important as those first few steps along the path to nation-hood taken by PNG’s founding fathers 40 years ago.”

Minister Temu said: “The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct – is something I passionately believe in.

“This is the kind of project I believe has been long needed in PNG. As demonstrated through our recent national achievements, we have shown that we can and will capitalise on this new opportunity.”

UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy will receive a modern building to underpin its planned transformation into a revitalised and regionally recognised centre of excellence for leadership development.

PNGIPA – which is being transformed into a new School of Government – will get a new library wing, meeting rooms and an administrative building.

The Precinct’s new brand was also officially unveiled. It features a stylised Kumul (Bird of Paradise) and a Pacific-inspired weave design.

Hundreds of students have already commenced Precinct-supported courses. However, student numbers will continue to rise, supported by Australian-funded teaching staff.

Minister Tabar said PNG needed high-performing, ethical and technically proficient leaders “that can capitalise on our abundant wealth in mineral and petroleum resources, and map the course of future generations”.

“The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct institutions – the University of Papua New Guinea School of Business Administration & Public Policy and the PNG Institute of Public Administration will be among the flag bearers for our nation-building effort,” Mr Tabar said.

Work is underway to strengthen the curriculum at both institutions, with a focus on governance, public policy and ethical decision-making.

The Precinct aims to strengthen leadership capabilities in PNG and across the Pacific, through degree and diploma courses in public policy, management and economics.

The empowerment of the next generation of PNG’s women leaders will be a major point of focus for the Precinct. An executive leadership program is also providing mid-career public servants and private sector managers with the skills they need to step up into senior leadership roles.

The Precinct complements PNG’s Ethics and Values-Based Leadership Framework, and Australia’s focus on supporting governance improvements across the region.

Watch the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct video outlining the Precinct’s past, present and future.

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Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop speaking at the Precinct launch

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Over 160 guests attended the launch of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct

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Unveiling of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct plaque by Ministers Bishop, Pato, Tabar and Temu

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Minister for PNG Public Service, Hon. Sir Puka Temu talking during the question and answer session as part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct launch

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After the launch the Ministers met with representatives from UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy and attendees from the Precinct’s leadership coures

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Hon. Julie Bishop, Australian Foreign Minister looks on as the Minister for Public Service, Hon. Sir Puka Temu speaks at the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct launch

 

 

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Minister Ciobo addresses Women in Leadership

Australia’s new Minister for International Development and the Pacific says getting more women into leadership positions will drive economic development in Papua New Guinea by boosting productivity and business confidence.

In one of his first official engagements in his new role, Minister Steven Ciobo said the under-representation of women in the formal economy, particularly in leadership roles, was preventing PNG in reaching it’s full economic potential.

He told an audience of female executives in Port Moresby today (October 9) that Australia wanted to do more to support the economic empowerment of PNG women and girls.

“As a friend and partner of Papua New Guinea, Australia recognises that women’s leadership in both the public and private sectors is vital to PNG’s prosperity and stability, and will help to forge a stronger, more inclusive and successful nation of the future,” he said.

“Research shows that of women had the same access to credit, markets and technology as men, the returns – in both the informal and formal sectors – would increase significantly.”

Mr Ciobo was addressing a masterclass for female managers offered through the Australian-funded Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct. The Women in Leadership workshop helps participants strengthen their skills as managers and influencers of workplace culture.

“The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct provides opportunities such as this course for women to foster greater collaboration between the private and public sectors in PNG, and contribute to better economic growth and the provision of public services,” he said.

“We want to see women having more of a say in running their family, their community, their workplace and their country,” he said.

The Australian Government’s support for PNG women falls into three specific areas: reducing violence against women; increasing women’s economic empowerment; and improving the ability of women to take on senior leadership roles.

In Melanesia, women occupy only a third of jobs in the formal economy, and men typically earn 20-50 per cent more than women because they work in jobs that attract higher salaries. The 2012 Economist Intelligence Unit placed PNG among the world’s bottom five nations in its Women’s Economic Opportunity Index.

“Women in PNG need access to agricultural resources and finance. They need to be empowered to become leaders in business, in politics, in education, in law and order and in the wider community,” Mr Ciobo said.

“I believe initiatives such as the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct will enhance women’s voice in leadership and decision-making, and will be the foundation for the future of this relationship.

“I applaud the Government of PNG for its commitment to building a new generation of ethical and effective public sector leaders in PNG, particularly those who are working to address barriers that restrict women’s full participation in economic activity.”

Minister Ciobo’s address was followed by a panel discussion which also featured UPNG’s Professor Betty Lovai, The Voice Executive Director Serena Sumanop, Origin Energy General Manager Lesieli Taviri, Internal Revenue Commissioner Betty Palaso and Dr Christine Nixon.

The two-day Women in Leadership Course was delivered on behalf of the Precinct by the Australian and New Zealand School of Government.

It was designed to complement the PNG Department of Personnel Management’s gender equity and social inclusion policy.

The workshop was facilitated by former Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Dr Christine Nixon.

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Women and minority groups in leadership

Senior public servants are working on new strategies to elevate women and minority groups in decision making roles as part of a short course by the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

More than 50 male and female public servants took part in the short course which was facilitated by Dr Orovu Sepo and who will provide ongoing mentoring in the workplace for 20 participants.

Participant Nellie McLay from the Morobe Provincial Administration
Participant Nellie McLay from the Morobe Provincial Administration

Two students from Kakar Island in Madang Province and the District Education Administrator Mr Poi Soss presented some perspectives from rural and remote areas, highlighting the impact of decision making at central government levels with the lives of young people in schools. This unique perspective was gained from a recent gender and education assessment conducted by Dr Jan Edwards who invited the girls to document through photos the positive and negative aspects of school life, particularly, infrastructure.

The Diversity in Leadership is one of the many short courses which will form part of the Precinct’s Executive Leadership Program.

 

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Modeling inclusive leadership

Training institutions in PNG aim to model a new inclusive form of leadership through the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct.

Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct stakeholders gathered this week in Port Moresby to discuss how the landmark leadership initiative would support women’s empowerment and social inclusion through its activities.

The proposed approach looks at building skills of students and staff, transforming institutions and workplaces through policies, quotas and networking, and addressing barriers to participation for the marginalized. In particular, the approach recognizes the real risks of gender-based violence for women and access to opportunities for people with a disability.

Key Precinct partners – UPNG, PNG Institute of Public Administration and the Department of Personnel Management – welcomed the proposed approach and indicated their commitment to the Precinct’s vision of equitable and inclusive leadership.

Key partners commit to Precinct's vision of equitable and inclusive leadership.
Key partners commit to Precinct’s vision of equitable and inclusive leadership.

The meeting represented the beginning of a conversation on inclusive leadership and the start of new collaboration between UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy, UPNG’s School of Humanities and Social Science, and the PNGIPA School of Government. UPNG’s Executive Dean Professor Betty Lovai attended the meeting as a champion of women’s empowerment with a strong emphasis on training and sensitizing the next generation of leaders with these values.

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Historic training institute looks to next 40 years

Future public service leaders are drawing inspiration from the renewal of the PNG Institute of Public Administration, where the nation’s founders planned its first independent government.

The historic institution – formerly known as the PNG Administrative College and home to the famous Bully Beef Club – is being rejuvenated as part of a new leadership precinct.

PNGIPA Director Angori Wewerang, who is marking his 12 month anniversary in the job, said he’d seen a dramatic change in the outlook of students during that time.

“The public servants who are doing training here are seeing the difference in the programs provided. There’s a new energy here. At nights they are staying after classes to do more studies. Good things are happening. And that’s what I believe will shape them when they go back, to bring back new value to their workplaces and make a difference in their communities,” he said.

PNGIPA Director and Deputy Director celebrating PNG's 40th Independence anniversary with staff.
PNGIPA Director and Deputy Director celebrating PNG’s 40th Independence anniversary with staff.

The institution, which will be known as the PNG School of Government, is receiving new Australian-funded buildings and a revamped curriculum.

The school will be part of the Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct, which will also include UPNG’s School of Business and Public Policy.

The changes seek to re-affirm the national importance of the institution where, in the early 1970s, the now-Grand Chief, Sir Michael Somare talked into the night with Bully Beef Club contemporaries about how PNG would become independent.

“My vision is to transform this place, to provide leadership training and development programs for Papua New Guinea public service leaders who will be able to lead and guide this nation through the next 40 years,” Mr Wewerang said.

Students at the PNGIPA Library (1970s)
Students at the PNGIPA Library (1970s)

PNGIPA students in the early 1970s
PNGIPA students in the early 1970s

Mr Wewerang said there was immense goodwill towards the institution from within and outside the public service.

“Australia’s support is vital,” he said. “Of course, it is not just the infrastructure that Australia is contributing towards. It is also helping to strengthen the training programs we provide.”

The PNGIPA is partnering with the Australian Public Service Commission and other Australian institutions such as CIT Solutions, to improve the quality and focus of the courses offered.

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Bon Voyage! PNG Public Servants Brisbane Bound for Precinct Course

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Bon Voyage! PNG Public Servants Brisbane Bound for Precinct Course

They will undertake a week of intensive coursework at the University of Queensland before returning to continue their studies in PNG.

The course is being offered as part of the Precinct’s Executive Leadership Program.

Theresa Siaguru, a Principal Advisor in the Department of Prime Minister and National Executive Council, said she was keen to build on her 40 years of experience in the public service.

“The training exposes us to thinking and perceptions which break away from our culture,” she said.

“We want to set the pace professionally and intellectually, and come back and make a difference.”

“I am excited and genuinely appreciate the support from the Precinct and the role of UQ in delivering this training.”

The course is being delivered by the University of Queensland but is tailored to the PNG context to ensure its relevance.

Students will undertake six weeks in intensive coursework in Brisbane and four weeks in PNG over the next 12 months. It will include group work, mentoring sessions and individual assessment.

The Pacific Leadership and Governance Precinct is a joint initiative of the PNG and Australian Governments to strengthen ethical and accountable leadership across the region.

Precinct courses bring together talented and motivated individuals, giving them the practical and ethical framework to advance in key national agencies.

The Precinct also offers higher and vocational courses through its partner institutions, the School of Business and Public Policy at the University of Papua New Guinea and the PNG Institute of Public Administration.

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UPNG business school rebadged to reflect new priorities

The University of Papua New Guinea’s business school has changed its name to reflect a new emphasis on public policy as part of a groundbreaking initiative to train the next generation of PNG leaders.

The new School of Business and Public Policy will be strengthened with additional academic staff and a new faculty building under a partnership between the Papua New Guinean and Australian Governments.

The rebranded school forms part of the new Pacific Leadership